Squarebashing at WMMS

game set up – before the doors open

This year at WMMS BAD wargamers put on a Squarebashing Demo, abstracting the 1st Day of the Somme. Peter the orgainsers notes were –

The massive casualties sustained on July 1st 1916 are seared into the public consciousness and for many define the futility of and incompetent conduct of the war. The truth is a little different. For Britain this war was effectively its first full scale engagement in the modern era. Despite earlier successes British armies had never been the main forces in European warfare. The French experienced similar losses in the opening encounters of the conflict at the battle Charleroi and by the opening of the Somme had suffered over 1 million battlefield casualties. Britain had launched offensives at Neuve Chapelle and Loos in 1915 but neither had the scale or weight of expectation that the offensive the Somme department bore
The British Empire had spent the previous two years building up its forces from the scale of the “contemptible” levels of the BEF to the point where large sections of the front were taken up by the newly raised four armies. The Bavarian forces making up the Second army in positon on the Somme
front found their daily ration of harassing fire switched largely to shrapnel as the British moved into place.

The first day saw 13 British divisions and 11 divisions assault after prolonged artillery preparation and met with mixed results . The battlefield divides nicely into a western British zone and a southern allied assault. The western offensive met with no real success and a massive butchers bill accounting for most of the 57,000 allied casualties of the day The southern front however resulted in a real defeat of the German forces by the British Fourth Army and the French Sixth Army and a significant penetration of the German defensive positions it was here that most allied effort would be directed in the future.The battle-campaign ground on in attritional warfare until November or February depending on who you listen to.

Why the difference in results on the first day? Many reasons are put forward but the themes we will try to represent are

1. The British forces were short of heavy artillery capable of smashing the dugouts in which German infantry and machine guns were held. The French had far more on the southern front.
2. British artillery shells had poor fuses resulting in forty percent duds. In the end we adopted a French design.
3. The southern front had more British Territorial troops and large numbers of French troops with far more experience of large scale engagements.
4. We will also try to represent other themes such as Allied air superiority, Allied mining efforts and successful bombardments of barbed wire entanglements.

Thanks all thoughts and prejudices are entirely the fault of the management in this case me , Peter Gregory

Southern Front  – post depletions 


Northern Front – post depletions 

 

Northern front, despite the punishing onslaught of rolling barrages and destruction of the sections of trench and damaging of on table MGs and artillery the German lines hold – reversing history !

The Southern front offers little defender resistance – reversing this outcome also!

Squarebashing is a set of rules for recreating warfare in the early part of the twentieth century where the battle field was dominated by rifle and machine gun fire before the development of mobile armoured formations allowed for deep penetrations of the enemy front and disruption of army level formations. Dominated by fixed positions and artillery fire it is often seen as a dull period for gaming.

Squarebashing brings some dynamism to divisional level engagements where the tantalising prospect of a breakthrough is snatched away by the arrival of reserves or a defensive barrage. Much of the action is abstracted to a degree but the feel is right and most aspects of the era are well represented.

The system is designed for pick -up games on club nights where matched forces can be brought and varied terrain deployed. The pre -battle system of asset allocation brings narrative, historical flavour and variety to each game. Games can be fought to a conclusion on a club night in a satisfying manner and so all is well and a growing number of armies have been painted up and deployed at our club. The only problem I have is that I want all the armies in the army list book. Each army comes with its own assets and potential historical events which makes them even more attractive to an addict like myself.

Of course, one is not constrained to play the game in this way. The game mechanics can be used as the basis for games with different objectives or specific historical refights. This provides the opportunity to do some research, act on the evidence or your prejudices and shape a game to your liking.

The games we are presenting are designed to be manageable: playable , enjoyable( to a point) and entirely reflective of the prejudices of the scenario designer Peter Gregory. I am fairly sure we will disappoint or annoy some people but since after 46 years as a wargamer I cannot find two players who agree on much this will not surprise us at Burton District Wargames Club

Walter Schnaffs Playtest

Played a 2nd game of Walter Schnaffs V2 .. this game was a bit one sided with the Prussians attacking with the French suffering fearful depletions. The revised version of skirmishers was probably a bit over powering and we’ll most likely go back to the prior iteration – and we don’t think it looked as good.

Pre depletions – French look strong on the Prussian left with a impressive looking cavalry wing

Post depletions – all the cavalry were late – and ended in up reserve! The French situation is perilously thin

The Prussian assets – now with a bit of corp artillery support – Baby barrage – combine with big full strength Prussian attack broke through the French line quite easily. The random millatreuse and Chasspot effects didn’t favour the French in this game as they had in the first – which was a great swinging battle


Large Prussian assault !

Over Rays dice were poor and that didn’t help. That said the Prussians only captured 2 of the 4 objectives – which given then the game level probably would have resulted in a mediocre Prussian win. “Von Bredows Death Ride” event worked a treat though


Little shot of the Prussian ‘reserve’ hidden behind the hill – very useful

Squarebashing Day 2017

Squarebashing 2017 is to be held on 24th June

 Battlefieldhobbies in Daventry.

It will be a team event (entries permitting). The armies are divided into 2 Pools. In each team – one player plays allies, the other central powers.

The lists and statuses are

There will be 2 games, Team against Team (Allies vs Central Powers). For each game the sum of each team score will be added to the team total. The army points are 620pts (standard game)

To encourage using under valued armies the sum total of army rating will be deducted from final score.

The terrain will be pre set , other than that, its RAW. You have the option to use the ‘Rays Stick’ method for countdown to battle. There will be no trench, canal or fort games. All painted figures please, we want it to look nice!

Any questions can be raised to me at Simon@lurkio.co.uk or via the RFCM forum

Tickets can be purchased using here

http://www.battlefieldhobbies.co.uk/our-events/

Can you please purchase tickets promptly , just so the venue has an idea on the lunch requirements. At the moment we are trying to get into the ‘big’ room which has meant that the cost has gone up a couple of quid (B/H need to put on another member of staff). But we need a dozen players to make that viable.

Tickets: £12.50 including lunch

Date: Saturday 24th June 2017

Location:
Battlefield Hobbies
17 Brunel Close
Daventry
Northants
NN11 8BR

Event Schedule
09.00-09.25 – Players arrive, welcome.
09:30-12.30 – Games One.
12.30-13:30 – Buffet lunch supplied.
13.30-16.30 – Game Two

You can get a t-shirt to celebrate the event

https://shop.spreadshirt.co.uk/rfcm/-A109805612?department=1&productType=812&color=A7B6AC&appearance=649

WW1 French 1915 Squarebashing – painting diary 1

With a big game of Squarebashing lined up for Christmas~ it comes down to looking at the availability of the figures. The intention is to play a 4 player per side – 16′- of squarebashing. Nominally this will be based on the Anglo/French attacking in the Third Battle of Artois (sept 1915 – close to our 100th anniversary date)

So the British First army (60k) , French Tenth Army (48K) vs German Sixth army (50K).

With the figures available there will have to be some fudging of earlier French dress, so with that I decided to paint up some later war French. With Peter Pig re-sculpting their late war French, and Battlefront releasing their French, the decision wasn’t so clear cut. But in the end I decided on Peter Pig. I knew that they would be clean cast – as I wanted as little prep as possible, and my last experiences with BF figures wasn’t great. It probably cost me more in the end, (accounting for BF deep discounting from online stores) , but at least I go what I want and it would match my other figures.

With Peter Pigs normal speedy delivery the figures had arrived within the week, and I was lining up to prep them for painting. The prep was a dream , on a lot of the figures I actually did nothing. Some have nubs on the bases (likely a vent from the mould) but not too much. On the figure themselves I had to de-flash maybe 10 out of 200+/-

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Painting.
Rather than basing it on any hard research I decided to base the colour palette I would use on the art of Tignous, the political satirist, who died during the Charlie Hebdo shooting. He colobarated on the Art for the game Les Poilus (later The Grizzled).

sweet November

lespoilus

So a rather playful, graphic blue. Rather than a washed out Horizon blue after weeks in the trenches! I was aiming to capture the essence of these illustration with its chalky backdrop and colourful uniforms. It rather suits 15mm which always benefits from a elevation in the colour register to give it that pop.

Prep stage 1 – lolly sticks

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All the figures are loosing grouped into like poses and are stuck to hobby/lolly stick with hot glue (gun). This will be a production line !

Primer.

GW Corax white. Great primer. Slighly off white but not so much that its noticeable. Only one coat needed. I did dust it with Skull white afterwards to get some natural shade. This was probably a mistake as the Skull white is very chalky by comparison and gave too much of a ‘key’ to the surface

Base Coat.

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I planned to use a wash colour base, then an ink wash. So sticking to the GW pantheon.

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Base colour – Hoeth blue thinned with Lahmian Medium. I have tried most other acrylic mediums/flow improvers out there. But nothing seems to cut it like this stuff. So with a watery mix slap it on. At this stage don’t worry as it will shrink back.

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Cut point here is to avoid any unnecessary finger contact with the primed figures. You don’t want greasy finger marks acting as a resist to your paint here.

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Wash – Gulliman blue 70%, Nuln Oil 30% … again this is thinning to a 50% wash/50% Lahmian medium.. When the figures are fully dry (best leave overnight slap that on)

Test strip.

So picking up a strip sample ist just a case of face (normal triad) , rifle – just a dark brown, and the packs. All washed with a Army Painter strong tone (brown) ink.. another stalwart in this painters arsenal.

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So that’s its just another 30 strips to go!

More Christmas gaming – Squarebashing

We’ve been playing Squarebashing for about a year now, so its time I wrote up a review. For the centennial of WW1, we’ve just concentrated on 1914 armies, and in this game we see the plucky BEF face of the Germans.

The Armies.
The classifications are pretty simplistic. Infantry and cavalry are broken down into reserves, regulars and professional. Each battalion is 4 bases in strength. MGs and artillery are single bases. Tanks and A/Cs are all single models.
The BEF are predominately professional, and therefore are small. The ‘standard’ game we played was something like 7 professional battalions, 2 regulars, 4 MGs and 4 artillery.
The German army of this period is based around a regular force. So we had 10 regulars, 2 reservist, 2 professional and 3 regular cavalry. In addition there were 4 artillery and 3 MGs.
With each army comes a set of assets (artillery barrages) and also ‘events’ (these being randomly determined effects that effect the game in some way)… more of these later.
This all comes round to a overall army status rating. This will determine the overall quality of the army (and ultimately and delta adjustment that is applied to the final victory point tally)

Countdown to War.
Peter Pigs rules often have a pre battle phase, Squarebashing is no exception. This consists of a 3 week period where events make have an effect on the game. This takes the form of a calendar in which you allocate values, which become numbers of dice. You and your opponent then do and opposed dice off (5&6s being successes) . The player with the higher number of successes then has the access to their armies ‘events’. This is a 2 dice roll. Values of 2-5 having a negative effect , and 5+ being positive (generally the higher the better). You can roll –over success to the next day, then gives you increased dice to throw and should you win and modifier to you event roll (+6) ,so you cannot get a bad result. With each event comes an attacking value. These are accumulated, and will determine who the attacker in the game is – and the level of attack
There are strategies to this. If you have a defensively minded army then you can stack alternate days to try and neutralise your opponent’s throws. However, I never seem to get this to work as I expect – or certainly not in a way that feels ‘favourable’
In the game we played here, we kept the values as ‘default’. The BEF doesn’t like to attack in my experience, but neither does it like to suffer ‘the big push’ …
The narrative that was rolled in the game was,
The BEF had initial good news (lucky dice), and Kitchener gave his ‘Khartoum speech’. This meant that the BEF could choose to reroll two sets of assault dice (both players)
Then the Germans just took over. The weather was good, and high command had issued aggressive orders. In game terms this meant that the Germans could ignore any terrain penalties for moving in turns 1 & 2 (so they would be moving swiftly). It also netted a good chunk of attack points. They also exploited gaps in the BEF line (this meant that 2 BEF battalions would be sent into reserve). This meant that the Germans were most likely to attack
Combined with the fact that the Germans had some cavalry (boosting the likelihood of attacking). It wasn’t quite ‘the big push’, but it was ‘attack all along the line’.

squarebashing1
Objectives, Terrain and deployment.
The table is 4’x3’, broken down into 6” squares. The defender sits at row 1 (the attacker row 6). Two roads are played (one by each player). The resulting crossroads is 1 objective. The defender then places another 3 objectives. There are restrictions. They cannot be placed in adjacent column, and the total of all the objects rows must be 13 or more. So what that means is that the objective are space across the table, and in games we tend to give one object to the attacker (row 5 or 6) to allow the other objective to be places in lower value rows. In the game objective further across the table will gain you larger victory points.
After the objective the defender places 8 pieces of terrain. Each terrain piece is 12”x6” (2 squares) , whereas an objective is 6”x6”. This makes it really easy to spot these things in the game.
The most notable effect of terrain is that troops have to dice to leave a terrain square. Once your Austrian conscripts have gone into that wood they really don’t like to come out! Other effects are that some terrain provides cover and some block LOS (although that is not so relevant)
In the game here with the Germans having unrestricted movement in turns 1 & 2 then they wasn’t much point in jamming up the top of the table to hinder their approach. So the BEF tried to construct a strong defensive line across the middle of the table.
The attacker does get some say. They get to allocate d6 dice to terrain and on a roll of 4+ they get to move them. In the game here that meant that the Germans could open up a corridor of open space to the left of the battlefield. To attempt to split the BEF, give a space for their cavalry to operate, and achieve a breakthrough.
The attacker then deploys the whole force in row 6, the defender then deploys in rows 1&2. Each square has a max occupancy of 3 units. If the attacker has more than 18 units then they have some that are forced into reserve.

squarebashin2

Depletions.
Everyone’s favourite part of the game! Before the game begins the attacker gets to deplete the defenders army. You can think of this in terms of preliminary barrage, or units losing their way of reassigned to a different section. What it means is that depending on the level of attack, a number of dice are thrown between 5-9~. For each 6 thrown one base of removed from the defenders battalion. This is done for each battalion (from R-L). Rather than taking the casualties the defender can put the troops into reserve. The throw can be modified by troop quality, placement and type. The defender must also have at least 1/3 (rounded down) of their infantry and cavalry off table).
This phase can be rather tense. If the attacker throws well then you can lose a lot of troops and you have a tricky decision to make whether to suffer the casualties of bring the troops on during the game. This is not a quick and reliable process.
In the game here we have 9 BEF battalions. 2 already have to be placed in reserve as a result of countdown to war events. So, only 1 more needed to go to reserve. The Germans scored well and the central objective had one of its professionals reduced to half strength. Placing then in reserve wasn’t really an option as the movement bonuses the Germans had would allow them to capture it quickly.
The BEF would be up against it. Their army was split. The left flank was isolated (although in good order), defending the crossroads in the town. The centre had been denuded significantly. The right flank was in good order, but strategically had little to do.
The defender then gets to place 2 sections of barricades.
Finally before the game begins each sides gets to pick a higher command strategy. There are 4 types available. Fighting, Morale, Assets and Movement – each with an associated bonus in that area.
The Germans picked Fighting. The BEF picked Morale.
The Game Turn.
There are quite a lot of phase in each game turn, and this can be quite daunting at first. Its definitely worth keeping the QRS to hand, as its listed there. Really it a good plan to stick to it rigidly to start as there are some nuances on the order of things. I won’t go in to explicit details on the order, but will try to give a flavour.
Assets
At the start of the game each army has a unique asset pool. This is a pool of dice in which to request that asset. Once the dice is used then that’s it. To successfully request and asset a single 6 is required. So for instance if you had 10 point effect barrage you could roll 1 dice for 10 turns hoping for a 6. More likely you would have 2 attempts with 5 dice. There are about a dozen or so assets and you can only pick 1 per turn. The game is about typically 6-8 turns long (could be as low as 4, or as high as 20 though!)
Morale
The trigger for a morale check is having a casualty figure in a square. A number of dice are accrued, 1 each of casualties , barrage, surrounded by opponents etc. These can be reduced by quality and ‘markers’. For each 4+ thrown this is 1 morale failure. 1 means no advance up to 3+ which is ‘quit the field’. Which sounds worse that it is. It means that if you have taken a couple of casualties (2 dice) from fire and under point effect barrage (3 dice) things aren’t going to go too well.
Movement
Infantry move 2 squares, cavalry 3, MG and Guns 1. No diagonals, quite easy. You can get a bonus move square if you don’t end up in a square adjacent to the enemy. The main issue for movement is leaving any terrain square to another. Each battalion dices to try and exit a terrain square. Professionals needing 2+, Conscripts 4+ . This can put a scupper on well laid plans!
Assault.
This is the main way of destroying the enemy and capturing a square. If a unit has movement points left it may assault a square occupied by the enemy. Each units in the assaulting square typically generates 3 dice (remembering a square occupancy limit of 3). Assaults need to be supported. Adjacent square add 2 dice to assaulters ‘dice pot’. Markers , flanks and lots of other little bonuses can add to that, defences etc can reduce it.
The defender normally gets 2 dice (5 dice for MGs!!) per unit & 1 dice per support square. Again a set of modifiers with add and subtract from that dice pool.
Both sides roll the dice, 5&6s are hits. Saves are then made. So infantry get a 50/50 save, again better and worse quality factors apply. If the attacker inflicts more hits then they win, and force the defenders to retreat a square and they move to occupy it. Casualty markers accrue and morale checks will be needed in the subsequent phase. Once you retreat you also take additional hits, it’s a slippery slope.
Shooting
You shoot in your opponent turn. Any square that has not been assaulted can fire. The range is only adjacent, except for artillery and mortars, so there is little need for LOS. Each battalion fires 1 dice and needs a 6 to hits (which can then be saved). It’s unlikely that you will drive your opponent off with shooting.
Reserves
If a side has reserves it can dice for arrival now. There are 3 options
1. Each units dices. A 6 and it can arrive
2. 1 unit comes on automatically
3. 1 unit comes on automatically on the road entrance square. 2 more dice rolls (needing 6) are also done.
Number 3 is most popular, and its not unusually for a defensive strategy to revolve around where the road is, as that is easier to defend.
Countdown clock.
The defender rolls 1 die. This is then knocked of the countdown clock (starting at 21). When it gets to 0 then the game ends.
Victory calculation.
When the game ends the victory points are calculated. Each KPI is either a value or a dice. The dice are thrown for a resulting victory points. So it can be a bit random. But in my experience it never makes a lot of difference in an ‘obvious’ victory, but can swing games that are closer. Each side’s values are compared and the resultant delta it referenced on a chart to get the final result. The key objectives are –
Defenders bonus. The defender gets bonus points for the level of attack they have to face.

  •  Destroying enemy bases.
  • Destroying enemy units
  • Capturing objectives. These are skewed in value by their relative position. So for
  • example the attacker gets 4d6-row for an objective, so this could be as little as
  • 4d6-6 (as little as 0 but typically ~8), or as high as 23 (typically 13~)
  • Capturing squares in either row 2 or 3 (ie a high defence, or aggressive attack)

Our game.
The game we played was pretty straightforward. The Germans has gained an advantage in the pre game phases. Their events had synergies, and the BEF had been depleted in the centre. The attacking Germans first turn called in a point effect barrage on the BEF centre. When a point effect barrage is rolled you place 9 barrage marked on an L shape of 3 squares. The square also takes hits. So if you take a casualties (d6 hits) , you are looking at a severe morale check in the next turn (a minimum of 4 dice), this can be reduced by a higher command order. The BEF had picked morale has their higher command. However, the first base to be lost (although only put in reserve) was the higher command team itself. So it moved off table and then the next turn couldn’t try to save its soldiers.

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The resulting morale check was grim. One object was completely evacuated, and the other was down to a damaged MG and 2 bases of infantry.

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The BEF had to shuffle to the right to try and fill the gaps that were opened in the centre. But that meant the right flank was becoming thin. They successfully received a suppression barrage (a 5 square long line of barrage markers), this did halt the Germans advance for 1 turn, but the BEF were just too thin on the ground.

squarebashing5
The left flank had 2 battalions of professional and a MG in a barricaded square (pretty tough). But it was isolated. It was surrounded and assaulted. The killer being that the gap that was opened up by the Germans allowed the cavalry to get behind the isolated Brits. This means that if you lose the assault then you cannot retreat and take additional hits. The BEF saves were good, but it was only a matter of time before they were whittled down. The German has captured two of the closer objectives at the start of the game, and were soon captured the left flack crossroads. They also got their cavalry to the BEF baseline to get a breakthrough bonus! The cavalry who are normally gunned down in games were definitely the stars with the swift advance, and stopped the BEF from retiring.

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The BEF were reduced to bring on a drib drab of reserves who were close the enemy and rushing to defend the last central objective. Which held on to, but it wasn’t enough. The Germans has achieved a solid victory.

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Conclusion
I like Squarebashing. I love the fact that it has a lot of chrome for the period. It does allow for forging a strong narrative in a game. Each stage of the game is documented and complete. I like the pre battle phase and terrain placement. I’m not a fan of ‘terrain placed by mutual agreement’ type rules.

Being a grid game it is anachronistic, and probably won’t be to everyone’s tastes. But I would recommend that anyone who has an interest in this period take a look

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georgie Georgies view –
I have to say I liked the game myself! The fate of the game was pretty much decided: Germans! The Britain’s were more Quality than Quantity and in this sort of game you need Quantity! In only the first few goes, the Germans had put most of the English men into reserve! The next couple of goes was total disaster, the Germans planted a destroying barrage on the mainly important (and the minimal amount of) soldiers, killing quite a few soldiers! Since you don’t have to measure the route, they could reach you in an amount of seconds! Near the end of the game (which was very long) I felt myself drifting away from the game. I would highly recommend this game to people who have a very wide attention span so that you can remain focused on the game! There is plenty to worry about because lots is always going on! I think it is a quite clever game!

Squarebashing Germans

The British are now all painted (just waiting to be based)

brit_fin

…now I turn my attention to the Germans. After the usual clean up and hot glue to craft sticks they are ready to go. They are new ‘re-sculpted’ Peter Pig Germans. I haven’t seen the originals so cannot compare. When comparing to the BEF I would say that they are a little finer – the facial details are certainly finer.

The BEF had taken me longer than I really wanted, it been over 2 weeks (although I have been distracted). For the Germans my original plan was to undercoat white and gloopy wash grey and then  varnish ‘stain’, in a similar way to the BEF.  But instead I thought I would cut out a stage and go for a coloured primer. I would have normally used a car primer grey (which is light and neutral), but I thought I’d try an army painter primer. I originally looked at the wolf grey (to get a bluish hue), but thought it was a little too blue. The uniform grey seemed to fit the bill, and with that purchased it was down to spraying. I did go a light dusting of white over the figures in the first instance. When using the AP primers in the past I have found  that you end up doing quite a heavy coat to cover all the bare metal. A tough of white primer first seems to alleviate that. It comes out a little brighter and stops a little of the capillary action pulling the paint into the recess.

After the priming I was pleasantly surprised that the grey had quite a blue hue to it anyway, so was I was looking for. It was a little dark though, and I did toy with the idea of airbrushing a highlight coat , or maybe a drybrush. BUT …  I reigned myself in …  this was meant to be a quick project.

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So post the primer I blocked in the boots , rifle stock, pack and helmet.

Then it came to the varnish ‘dip’/’stain’. I suppose in my mind I was going to use AP dark tone. The £1 shop varnish I used last time does have a mahogany tint, and I didn’t really want to the lose the blue grey that I had achieved. The AP dark tone is based on an oily black rather than brown, so seemed to fit the bill. It also meant that the 2 protagonist armies would have a distinct tonal difference.

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After that had dried , then I went back and did the face and hands. I like these to be bright, and doing this before the washes had a horrible dirtying effect. Then  a bit of red piping , and a touch of metal. Then a matt varnish and the job is complete.

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Overall I’m not as happy with these as the BEF. Greens and browns are much easier to pull together with this sort of wash technique. My complaints are , they are too dark for my tastes. germ4The AP dip is very strong. The base coat was a little too dark. If I had stuck to my original plan and gone white – acrylic wash , then I could have had more control and that stage does add a highlighting element. The overall figures just have a flat appearance with little in the way of contrast.germ5

 

 

That said its all about getting the soldiers on the table , for this project I can let it slide.

There are more Germans than British, so I will allow myself another 2 weeks to get these done. I should probably think of this in terms of 37 days …  a countdown to war…

A little bit of Squarebashing

After being caught up with all the centenary media (esp 37 Days), I thought that this year would be a good idea to do a little WW1. The remit of this project would that it would be up and running in a few weeks. Concentrating on the very early part of the war I needed to be playing while the period was still ‘hot’. With that in mind here is my tutorial on how to paint 200 infantry in about 2 weeks.

The first army will be the small British BEF. My preferred 15mm manufacturer being Peter Pig. The reasons being – neatly cast (no cleanup) , comprehensive range , quirky looking sculpts (with a reasonable high relief – more on that later)…. And finally ‘all round good eggs at PP’

With this in mind I will commit to do the whole of the army in a single ‘process batch’. Here are the steps –

prep1

Debag the figures.
Clean up (none), other than a scrape along the bottom to keep the base flat
Hot glue gun them lolly sticks (the large ‘tongue depressor’ type). Bagful for a £1 at a craft shop/works

prep2

Primer. I picked PSC German Dunkel Gelb for this job. It has a rather pleasing green hue, and it light and bright. As the project would be a ‘wash’ project then at this stage you can afford to be light and bright. The subsequent washes will bring it down (and I like bright!)

prep3

Primary Wash. Mix up a big batch of gloopy paint wash. There wasn’t much method to this. It was just a mix of khaki and green (Vallejo Brown violet) until it was an approximation of the colours I was aiming for.

prep4

Mix to milky consistency, a bit of acrylic flow improver (vital to avoid tide marks). But on a ‘spray primer’ I find that the surface tension means that you do get a good capillary action. The main worry is that this is too much and the paint pools. Flow improver is good for that. The best I’ve found is GW Lahmian medium (but it is expensive) and for smaller batches I’d recommend. But in this case I just use a cheapo (Windsor and Newton)..

prep5As you can see at this stage you don’t have to be be too fussy and can really blob it on. When it dries it will shrink back and you are trying to use the paint over the primer to do your shading.
At this point I’m going to block paint all the main areas of colour. So, webbing and pack with a lighter canvas colour, rifle stock brown. Not leave the face at this point. The face is the only thing I’m going to paint. The face is a focal point for the eye, do this well and all else if forgiven

 

 

Shading Wash. Once you this has dried (leave overnight) then comes the varnish wash. This is a red/brown/mahogany darkoakthat I bought from a £1 shop. Thinned down with turps to a very wet wash and lather it on. All the figure brightness will drop anyway at this point. You can use Army painter dips (which are probably better colour ranges) , but the only thing I find is that they give a waxy finish when dry and its hard to paint any detail over later. I might use AP dip for the Boche later. I like my cheap dip, as it had a Polyurethane finish and acts as a hard coat and can easily be painted over.

prep6

Leave to dry for 2 days. This stuff take a long time to dry, and is really stinky , so is best left outside (or in a shed)

Then it is really the home run.

Face painting. A orange brown base coat foe hands and face, then AP tanned flesh and AP barbarian flesh ( I bought a new brush for this, just for a crisp edge). As I said it you do a good face then all else will be overlooked. This triad does give quite a ruddy complexion , but as this was a decision to contrast with uniform (and bring out the greens) .. red and green been complementary on the colour wheel.
You may choice to put in a little paint over the webbing and bring out a strap or two.

fin1

The final stage being the matt varnish. I like a lead chromate based paint (outside job) , 1407 Rail Match Matt Varnish. I have been using this for 20 years and have found no equal (and I tried them all!)

fin2

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