Age of Sigmar at Warhammer world

Being at the release party of Age of Sigmar at Warhammer World was too good an opportunity to miss. So booking an ealry table for a bit of 40K action in the morning we headed off to Lenton.

First thing , the rumours were true and the Space Marine and Aquila has been usurped by a ’Sigmarine’.

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We saw the new Forgeworld shop. Sadly, this is as close as we’ll come to owning one of these bad boys – £900 to you sir!aos2

A quick précis of our 40K game. We had just painted up the tomb blades as that Logan could field a Reclamation legion. However, as we were only playing 650 (to get a 120 min game in ) he didn’t want to use the immortals and opted to use lychguard.

aos5That drop in reanimation protocols tipped the balance. I’d knocked up Ultramarines with Tigurius and devastator Centurions and 2 tactical units with Grav guns too. The Ultramarines normally had a torrid time against the Necrons so I beefed them up a bit. But perhaps a bit to much. So with Tigurius getting Invisibility (not hard) then invisible Centurions pounded out the fire.
Pretty much a whitewash …. So just goes to show that even with points you have to consider what level to aim the game at! (more on this later)

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So after the obligatory lunch at Bugman we pressed on to the Age of Sigmar demos.

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“For you Lurz ze war is over.. relegated to scaring small children exiting the washroom”

Unless you have been living in a hole then you know what the Age of Sigmar is, and the nerd rage that this has generated.  I tried to take an objective view of the whole situation. I’ve being playing Warhammer Fantasy battle since 1983, and every edition (to a greater or lesser extent). I admit it has come as rather a shock to see the old world ended. Its heritage in engrained in my psyche after 30 years.

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“The games being played of AoS (non GW demo), looked neither skirmish or ‘just a mash up’. Also the standard or presentation looked markedly higher, with all the big kits out on display”

However the demos flowed pretty well. I thought it was going to be a hard sell, but after 10 minutes I picked it up. It not hard … it very lite. aos7But do you know what ? it was actually quite fun!  Lets put aside balance and all that sort of stuff , the games there were the starter boxes and are probably balanced. But there was a situational tactical element to it. The sequence of activation and pile in choices meant something. aos8The magic is toned down and the monsters are toned down .. I cab see how big units are not going to be effective  with the bravery test (which can double up your casualties).

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So there you have it, I enjoyed it!  Not enough to buy the box (and it they can’t sell it to me – then they might be in trouble! ). The aesthetic might not suit me , or the fluff might be nonsense. But the game seems to work in a beer and pretzels sense. Not the convoluted WFB charge baiting or hero hammer (guff) … and I can see it not suiting all, but I can see it really making a difference to their entry level target market.  So I can see it being successful. Maybe not with ubergamers, but kids and old (wise) gamers for sure.

We played 2 starter box games , in about 2 hours. Fun has had by all, and our opponents shook our hand at the end !

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I did speak to various folk – it seemed staffers were touting for opinion – and as a wargaming face who am I to remain silent 😉  The whole balance thing did come up (no points – all that stuff) … and I think we need to wait for the next – big – book just out on pre release now, as that has all the ‘battle plans’.. as I understand it a cross between a dataslate and scenario generator. They expect maturity in the gaming fraternity to be able to deal with the games that they want to play. The framework is very loose, and thy want to give as many options for people to play as possible. Have they read Black Powder  I wonder 🙂

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“Logan with his new Space Wolf T-shirt”

While we were there the new exhibition centre was open. So we checked it out. I was looking forward to seeing all the old models , but when I saw them I was a bit disappointed as I’ve got them all! However the new exhibits were stunning .. So here are some selected photos.

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The day just raced by and it was soon 6pm and time to leave – great day 🙂

Warhammer World trip

We took a trip up the road to Lenton to Warhammer world, this was Logan’s first visit, and it was my birthday too.  We booked a table to play a game in advance, so we had anticipated to stay the whole day. We’d booked into the Premier Inn just along the canal at Nottingham Marina (which is actually recommended, as you couldn’t get any closer and avoids all the unpleasant road works around Lenton. They are putting new tram lines in and actually when they are finished getting to WW will be a breeze as the tram goes right outside to the railway station.

Warhammer world is going through renovations right now, with a grand re-opening in May. It was a little disappointing the museum/exhibition centre was closed, the shop seemed reduced in range, and the number of gaming table looked lessened and more cramped. However, there is still Bugmans bar.I could just spend the weekend there!

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We played our game in the morning, and a luck would have it it was the last day for submission to army of the month. So, the staff there were keen for us to submit our armies – which we did. That meant hanging around for a few more hours after lunch.

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Which was fine, we have cake and coffee and a leisurely wander around the other games and store. I was genuinely surprised about the amount of unpainted figures that were in use. For the flagship store you’d think they would have some sort of minimum requirement. These weren’t young kids that were doing this!ww4

Anyway come 4 o’clock the announcement was made and Logan had won the army of the month – which as you can imagine he was pleased as punch. His army is now on display there for the next month in the winners cabinet if you have chance to swing by.

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Nice day out.

I’ll let Logan tell his story!

On Friday 27th 2015 we went to Nottingham and stayed at a hotel overnight. The next day me and dad went to Warhammer world while mum and Georgie went shopping, as we walked up the gravely road the first thing I saw was a giant statue of a space marine looming ahead. Behind it was a life sized model of a rhino parked in the middle of the huge car park.

ww1We walked through the entrance of the building into a dwarf restaurant called Bugman’s which had an excellent menu full of delicious meals. Then we went into the gigantic gaming room full of quality tables, I got a little bit of a shock when I turned round and saw Lurtz glaring down at me from up a stand next to the door! Next me and dad went down to our reserved table in the middle of the big room and set up our game, with me playing necrons and dad playing grey knights (oh no!). On turn one I rolled a six (oh boy! I needed a lot of those!) ww3So I went first. Since no grey knights were on the table yet (they all teleport in 🙁 ) I had to move so I shuffled my warriors a bit and moved some of my tanks forward and that was really all I could do. Next dad deep striked all over the table with his big titan-y robots right in the middle of my base, capturing all the objectives and ruining my plan. Then he had the nerve to challenge my warlord, foolishly, I accepted and guess what? My lord got killed outright, before I could even attack! I was furious and pushed forward with all my might but it was no use the grey knights are too good. Halfway through, a man came up to us and asked us if we were entering the “army of the month” competition and we said no (we weren’t) so he asked us if we’d like to and we said yes and he told us to put our army’s in the glass cabinet at one o’clock and. So we carried on playing until one, and packed up our stuff to display in the cabinet. Then we had 2 hours to kill so we went back to Bugman’s and I had cockatrice pieces (chicken nuggets) ww7and some juice. Next we went to the shop/stall and had a look round then I took out my wallet and brought a rhino for my space wolf army.

ww6It was three o’clock now and we were waiting for the votes to come in when they finally did I was extremely nervous. The winner for the staff’s choice was another necron army then they said the ultimate winner was another necron army, I knew there was only two other necron army’s left mine and someone else’s. They said the winner was…

MINE!!!

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Me! Me! I was the winner! After I’d had my pictures taken and got a certificate we went to Bugman’s to have coffee and cake and the next day we went home.

More Christmas gaming – Squarebashing

We’ve been playing Squarebashing for about a year now, so its time I wrote up a review. For the centennial of WW1, we’ve just concentrated on 1914 armies, and in this game we see the plucky BEF face of the Germans.

The Armies.
The classifications are pretty simplistic. Infantry and cavalry are broken down into reserves, regulars and professional. Each battalion is 4 bases in strength. MGs and artillery are single bases. Tanks and A/Cs are all single models.
The BEF are predominately professional, and therefore are small. The ‘standard’ game we played was something like 7 professional battalions, 2 regulars, 4 MGs and 4 artillery.
The German army of this period is based around a regular force. So we had 10 regulars, 2 reservist, 2 professional and 3 regular cavalry. In addition there were 4 artillery and 3 MGs.
With each army comes a set of assets (artillery barrages) and also ‘events’ (these being randomly determined effects that effect the game in some way)… more of these later.
This all comes round to a overall army status rating. This will determine the overall quality of the army (and ultimately and delta adjustment that is applied to the final victory point tally)

Countdown to War.
Peter Pigs rules often have a pre battle phase, Squarebashing is no exception. This consists of a 3 week period where events make have an effect on the game. This takes the form of a calendar in which you allocate values, which become numbers of dice. You and your opponent then do and opposed dice off (5&6s being successes) . The player with the higher number of successes then has the access to their armies ‘events’. This is a 2 dice roll. Values of 2-5 having a negative effect , and 5+ being positive (generally the higher the better). You can roll –over success to the next day, then gives you increased dice to throw and should you win and modifier to you event roll (+6) ,so you cannot get a bad result. With each event comes an attacking value. These are accumulated, and will determine who the attacker in the game is – and the level of attack
There are strategies to this. If you have a defensively minded army then you can stack alternate days to try and neutralise your opponent’s throws. However, I never seem to get this to work as I expect – or certainly not in a way that feels ‘favourable’
In the game we played here, we kept the values as ‘default’. The BEF doesn’t like to attack in my experience, but neither does it like to suffer ‘the big push’ …
The narrative that was rolled in the game was,
The BEF had initial good news (lucky dice), and Kitchener gave his ‘Khartoum speech’. This meant that the BEF could choose to reroll two sets of assault dice (both players)
Then the Germans just took over. The weather was good, and high command had issued aggressive orders. In game terms this meant that the Germans could ignore any terrain penalties for moving in turns 1 & 2 (so they would be moving swiftly). It also netted a good chunk of attack points. They also exploited gaps in the BEF line (this meant that 2 BEF battalions would be sent into reserve). This meant that the Germans were most likely to attack
Combined with the fact that the Germans had some cavalry (boosting the likelihood of attacking). It wasn’t quite ‘the big push’, but it was ‘attack all along the line’.

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Objectives, Terrain and deployment.
The table is 4’x3’, broken down into 6” squares. The defender sits at row 1 (the attacker row 6). Two roads are played (one by each player). The resulting crossroads is 1 objective. The defender then places another 3 objectives. There are restrictions. They cannot be placed in adjacent column, and the total of all the objects rows must be 13 or more. So what that means is that the objective are space across the table, and in games we tend to give one object to the attacker (row 5 or 6) to allow the other objective to be places in lower value rows. In the game objective further across the table will gain you larger victory points.
After the objective the defender places 8 pieces of terrain. Each terrain piece is 12”x6” (2 squares) , whereas an objective is 6”x6”. This makes it really easy to spot these things in the game.
The most notable effect of terrain is that troops have to dice to leave a terrain square. Once your Austrian conscripts have gone into that wood they really don’t like to come out! Other effects are that some terrain provides cover and some block LOS (although that is not so relevant)
In the game here with the Germans having unrestricted movement in turns 1 & 2 then they wasn’t much point in jamming up the top of the table to hinder their approach. So the BEF tried to construct a strong defensive line across the middle of the table.
The attacker does get some say. They get to allocate d6 dice to terrain and on a roll of 4+ they get to move them. In the game here that meant that the Germans could open up a corridor of open space to the left of the battlefield. To attempt to split the BEF, give a space for their cavalry to operate, and achieve a breakthrough.
The attacker then deploys the whole force in row 6, the defender then deploys in rows 1&2. Each square has a max occupancy of 3 units. If the attacker has more than 18 units then they have some that are forced into reserve.

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Depletions.
Everyone’s favourite part of the game! Before the game begins the attacker gets to deplete the defenders army. You can think of this in terms of preliminary barrage, or units losing their way of reassigned to a different section. What it means is that depending on the level of attack, a number of dice are thrown between 5-9~. For each 6 thrown one base of removed from the defenders battalion. This is done for each battalion (from R-L). Rather than taking the casualties the defender can put the troops into reserve. The throw can be modified by troop quality, placement and type. The defender must also have at least 1/3 (rounded down) of their infantry and cavalry off table).
This phase can be rather tense. If the attacker throws well then you can lose a lot of troops and you have a tricky decision to make whether to suffer the casualties of bring the troops on during the game. This is not a quick and reliable process.
In the game here we have 9 BEF battalions. 2 already have to be placed in reserve as a result of countdown to war events. So, only 1 more needed to go to reserve. The Germans scored well and the central objective had one of its professionals reduced to half strength. Placing then in reserve wasn’t really an option as the movement bonuses the Germans had would allow them to capture it quickly.
The BEF would be up against it. Their army was split. The left flank was isolated (although in good order), defending the crossroads in the town. The centre had been denuded significantly. The right flank was in good order, but strategically had little to do.
The defender then gets to place 2 sections of barricades.
Finally before the game begins each sides gets to pick a higher command strategy. There are 4 types available. Fighting, Morale, Assets and Movement – each with an associated bonus in that area.
The Germans picked Fighting. The BEF picked Morale.
The Game Turn.
There are quite a lot of phase in each game turn, and this can be quite daunting at first. Its definitely worth keeping the QRS to hand, as its listed there. Really it a good plan to stick to it rigidly to start as there are some nuances on the order of things. I won’t go in to explicit details on the order, but will try to give a flavour.
Assets
At the start of the game each army has a unique asset pool. This is a pool of dice in which to request that asset. Once the dice is used then that’s it. To successfully request and asset a single 6 is required. So for instance if you had 10 point effect barrage you could roll 1 dice for 10 turns hoping for a 6. More likely you would have 2 attempts with 5 dice. There are about a dozen or so assets and you can only pick 1 per turn. The game is about typically 6-8 turns long (could be as low as 4, or as high as 20 though!)
Morale
The trigger for a morale check is having a casualty figure in a square. A number of dice are accrued, 1 each of casualties , barrage, surrounded by opponents etc. These can be reduced by quality and ‘markers’. For each 4+ thrown this is 1 morale failure. 1 means no advance up to 3+ which is ‘quit the field’. Which sounds worse that it is. It means that if you have taken a couple of casualties (2 dice) from fire and under point effect barrage (3 dice) things aren’t going to go too well.
Movement
Infantry move 2 squares, cavalry 3, MG and Guns 1. No diagonals, quite easy. You can get a bonus move square if you don’t end up in a square adjacent to the enemy. The main issue for movement is leaving any terrain square to another. Each battalion dices to try and exit a terrain square. Professionals needing 2+, Conscripts 4+ . This can put a scupper on well laid plans!
Assault.
This is the main way of destroying the enemy and capturing a square. If a unit has movement points left it may assault a square occupied by the enemy. Each units in the assaulting square typically generates 3 dice (remembering a square occupancy limit of 3). Assaults need to be supported. Adjacent square add 2 dice to assaulters ‘dice pot’. Markers , flanks and lots of other little bonuses can add to that, defences etc can reduce it.
The defender normally gets 2 dice (5 dice for MGs!!) per unit & 1 dice per support square. Again a set of modifiers with add and subtract from that dice pool.
Both sides roll the dice, 5&6s are hits. Saves are then made. So infantry get a 50/50 save, again better and worse quality factors apply. If the attacker inflicts more hits then they win, and force the defenders to retreat a square and they move to occupy it. Casualty markers accrue and morale checks will be needed in the subsequent phase. Once you retreat you also take additional hits, it’s a slippery slope.
Shooting
You shoot in your opponent turn. Any square that has not been assaulted can fire. The range is only adjacent, except for artillery and mortars, so there is little need for LOS. Each battalion fires 1 dice and needs a 6 to hits (which can then be saved). It’s unlikely that you will drive your opponent off with shooting.
Reserves
If a side has reserves it can dice for arrival now. There are 3 options
1. Each units dices. A 6 and it can arrive
2. 1 unit comes on automatically
3. 1 unit comes on automatically on the road entrance square. 2 more dice rolls (needing 6) are also done.
Number 3 is most popular, and its not unusually for a defensive strategy to revolve around where the road is, as that is easier to defend.
Countdown clock.
The defender rolls 1 die. This is then knocked of the countdown clock (starting at 21). When it gets to 0 then the game ends.
Victory calculation.
When the game ends the victory points are calculated. Each KPI is either a value or a dice. The dice are thrown for a resulting victory points. So it can be a bit random. But in my experience it never makes a lot of difference in an ‘obvious’ victory, but can swing games that are closer. Each side’s values are compared and the resultant delta it referenced on a chart to get the final result. The key objectives are –
Defenders bonus. The defender gets bonus points for the level of attack they have to face.

  •  Destroying enemy bases.
  • Destroying enemy units
  • Capturing objectives. These are skewed in value by their relative position. So for
  • example the attacker gets 4d6-row for an objective, so this could be as little as
  • 4d6-6 (as little as 0 but typically ~8), or as high as 23 (typically 13~)
  • Capturing squares in either row 2 or 3 (ie a high defence, or aggressive attack)

Our game.
The game we played was pretty straightforward. The Germans has gained an advantage in the pre game phases. Their events had synergies, and the BEF had been depleted in the centre. The attacking Germans first turn called in a point effect barrage on the BEF centre. When a point effect barrage is rolled you place 9 barrage marked on an L shape of 3 squares. The square also takes hits. So if you take a casualties (d6 hits) , you are looking at a severe morale check in the next turn (a minimum of 4 dice), this can be reduced by a higher command order. The BEF had picked morale has their higher command. However, the first base to be lost (although only put in reserve) was the higher command team itself. So it moved off table and then the next turn couldn’t try to save its soldiers.

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The resulting morale check was grim. One object was completely evacuated, and the other was down to a damaged MG and 2 bases of infantry.

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The BEF had to shuffle to the right to try and fill the gaps that were opened in the centre. But that meant the right flank was becoming thin. They successfully received a suppression barrage (a 5 square long line of barrage markers), this did halt the Germans advance for 1 turn, but the BEF were just too thin on the ground.

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The left flank had 2 battalions of professional and a MG in a barricaded square (pretty tough). But it was isolated. It was surrounded and assaulted. The killer being that the gap that was opened up by the Germans allowed the cavalry to get behind the isolated Brits. This means that if you lose the assault then you cannot retreat and take additional hits. The BEF saves were good, but it was only a matter of time before they were whittled down. The German has captured two of the closer objectives at the start of the game, and were soon captured the left flack crossroads. They also got their cavalry to the BEF baseline to get a breakthrough bonus! The cavalry who are normally gunned down in games were definitely the stars with the swift advance, and stopped the BEF from retiring.

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The BEF were reduced to bring on a drib drab of reserves who were close the enemy and rushing to defend the last central objective. Which held on to, but it wasn’t enough. The Germans has achieved a solid victory.

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Conclusion
I like Squarebashing. I love the fact that it has a lot of chrome for the period. It does allow for forging a strong narrative in a game. Each stage of the game is documented and complete. I like the pre battle phase and terrain placement. I’m not a fan of ‘terrain placed by mutual agreement’ type rules.

Being a grid game it is anachronistic, and probably won’t be to everyone’s tastes. But I would recommend that anyone who has an interest in this period take a look

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georgie Georgies view –
I have to say I liked the game myself! The fate of the game was pretty much decided: Germans! The Britain’s were more Quality than Quantity and in this sort of game you need Quantity! In only the first few goes, the Germans had put most of the English men into reserve! The next couple of goes was total disaster, the Germans planted a destroying barrage on the mainly important (and the minimal amount of) soldiers, killing quite a few soldiers! Since you don’t have to measure the route, they could reach you in an amount of seconds! Near the end of the game (which was very long) I felt myself drifting away from the game. I would highly recommend this game to people who have a very wide attention span so that you can remain focused on the game! There is plenty to worry about because lots is always going on! I think it is a quite clever game!

Christmas Gaming

Quiet often reviving old games from years gone by can be a mistake. The rose tinted spectacles that accompany such exercises can prove disappointing. However, I am always attracted to games of my youth, Dungeonquest being no exception. The FF revised edition is what we played today. Easier as don’t have too many memories of the original, but with the kids outgrowing the old TSR/Wizkidz Dungeon – having played it many times! I thought it would be a step up to a more mature game (queue references to D&D akin to double entry bookkeeping)

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The game flows much better than I remember. There is defined period of play (the suntrack), players have activities outside of their turn. Each turn is speedy, so the game moves along at a fair old pace. When I looked at the box it estimated 1hr. I can vouch for that as we played 2 games in 2 hours, both with a conclusion.

What I like about it the most is that there is a real challenge to escape the dungeon. With 15-20 turns in total your really have consider your exit strategy from the start. For instance 6 turns in going into the catacombs can be a real mistake considering you have to pull a card to get out and then you end up in a random spot that can be impossible to get out from. Greedy players intent on getting to the Dragon room in the centre have their work cut out to get in and out in time.dq3

I also like the fatal nature of the game. Not often a good thing when you draw a card where the negative outcome is ‘character death’. But with the quick turnaround of the game itself then it’s actually OK. Quite often you can ‘secret door’ into a empty room with no exits, and with no way out (ie in your action turn you cannot move or search, then you die) … it adds to the sense of adventure (after all you cannot have adventure without risk)

We played 2 games. In the first all members died. Georgie and I went into the catacombs too late. Georgie succumbing to a blade trap and my character being eroded away by Razorwings then getting finishes off by a ‘Greedy Deep Elf’ whom I couldn’t afford to bribe to get me out of the Catacombs. That left the way clear for Logan to just escape to win. At that point he was in the Dragon chamber, with a treasure. He got all the way to the penultimate space to exit. This was a trap space. Its result was ceiling fall and the room rotates forcing him into a pit from which he couldn’t escape. It was exciting and had the children demanding more.

The second game was similar. I had a swift exist. Single room with a secret door leaving to a empty room … trapped !

Georgie entered the catacombs again. Dew 2 spiders and was gradually being bitten to death. She spent about 8 turns in there before succumbing to monsters with no exit in sight.

Logan had been stalled at the beginning being stuck in a spider web and then caught with rockfalls with a lowly agile character. However, with both other players gone his lowly 40 GP was enough to escape and win with 2 turns to spare before night started to fall. An inauspicious victory – but aren’t they the sweetest?

dq4Great Christmas game with the Kids – recommended.

 Georgie review

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Personally I thought it was an amazing game because imagination sprouted in every nook and cranny there was! It was extremely tense, scary and exciting. It was exciting because there were multiple ways you died; you could die by the sun timer and you would get trapped if you didn’t get out in time, there is a massive possibility to get killed by a monster, you draw an unlucky room tile and get you trapped in an area with no doors only walls or you could be a victim to lethal weapons! My brother Logan has won every time so far (2) and I’ve died every time so far! It’s almost comical about how dangerous it is!

 Zulus on the ramparts was the 2nd game we played. In this it’s a solo/co-op where the gameplay is keeping the 4 lines (each representing the horns, chest & loins) of the Zulu threat out of Rorkes drift. This wasn’t such a hit. It took a long time to punch out the chits. There was only 1 sheet, and it was laser cut , but the slots were very tight and there was substantial sooting from the laser cuts (small niggles I know)

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The game is strong on narrative with all the character represented. But it made for very disrupted game. There was a repeated reference to the rule book. There was a lot (to my mind) of ambiguity in the rules and lack of clarity. This despite each rules section being broken up with a specific point references. Duplication of the same action in the same game turn (bringing heroes to the fore) was clunky. I could feel the kids drifting away. I thought I would like it more. I had Schiess on the north wall, Hook in the hospital. Even the ‘Pot that man’ volley card couldn’t save me from being disappointed. I’ll give it another go, but one first reflection there are better resource management exercises out there.

georgieGeorgie review

Truthfully I found the game dull and a bit tedious since, let’s just say, it took longer to set the game up than to actually play! I didn’t really understand it! The good thing is that we won on our first go! It didn’t really have enough going on and wasn’t really exciting because we mostly just pushed the Zulus away from the camp, they came back and we shot at them again. The turns were too quick for me to get an idea of what was going on and when I did get an idea, it was too slow for me to pay attention.

Preferably I’d choose Dungeon Quest over Zulus because I’m more of the imaginative type and like to make decisions and I liked to have my own character!

 

Tabletop games day 2014

Yesterday was international tabletop games day. I normally would have gone to my LFGS , but everyone was struck with the bout of the lurgy. So rather than miss it tabletopday2014_300x250altogether it seems a good idea to lock the doors , draw the curtains and have a day altogether playing old favourite sharing our own germs. As a family affair the games would have to be kid friendly (9 & 10) and also ‘mummy’ friendly – not so easy!

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First up was Metro. The theme being Art Nouveau Parisian rail management. It’s a simple pattern matching game as players place tiles to try and create long tracks from station to station.metro1 It’s a great kick off game as you can put as must or as little effort in (as the tile placement is quite prescribed), and other player tiles an easily mess up your well planned ideas

georgieANDloganGeorgie writes -When we played the game Metro, it was really quite fun. It was a kind of game you really had to think about and plan in your head otherwise you got really confused. I like it when you have a proper family game that nearly everyone can play plus if I got to rate it it would definitely be a 5 out of 5!

Next up was Wings of War. WW1 themed combat (in the centenary year). wog1The game is played with placement card planned for 3 moves in advance. The shooting is drawing cards from damage deck. Our game we had to call short as we had to break for dinner. It was a bit skewed by the Allies insisting on using a 2 seater! Have and fore and aft machine gun sounds like a good thing, but the single gun only has a lesser capablility. In the initial pass the Allies had the worst of it. The Nieuport took 7 damaged and damaged rudder meaning that it couldn’t turn right for the remainder of the game. The DH4 opponents drew a slew of 0 damage cards from front and aft. So advantage to the Germans , but a long way to go before we called time for lunch

georgieANDloganGeorgie writes – Unfortunately we had to stop the game in the middle but we got most of it. I like the way you don’t know what other people are going to do and your card may not work for the other players!

 

Game 3 was the choice of my little boy – Warmachine.warmachine A starter box match between Khador and Cygnar. Using the quick starter rules it makes things a lot easier and Warmachine less of a brain strain than Hordes. What’s not to like with big battling robots!

Georgie writes – War-machine. Just a game filled to the brim of plans and carefree fighting! Robots fighting robots. It does not get any better! At first I didn’t really fancy playing but now I can see how my dad and brother liked so much!

 

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For afternoon tea we took in a little Tongiaki. A game of Polynesian island conquest.tongiaki I used to have fun with this a few years ago, but couldn’t quite get it this time round. There is partly a co-operative element where players need to group together in numbers to make sea travel less risky. The flip side of that coin is sacrificing your own pieces to send you opponents on treacherous sea voyages where sometimes they never come back!

Georgie writes – Tongiaki was a game of luck, waiting for which card would come out of the pile and seeing if you would get lost. It was a really fun and easy game to play. A good game in a short amount of time.

Finally and getting late was the old skool dungeon bash – Dungeons and Dragons. d&d2Lower the lights and get the flickering candles as a bunch of intrepid adventures must enter the dungeon to find the portal to enable the trapped children return home in time for school in the morning! This was an old Pendraken 10mm dungeon that I’ve had for many years. It’s nice to experience a 9 & 10 years olds naïve view of the dungeon experience. The simplest of encounters and traps all ‘new to young eyes’! Lovely

georgieANDloganGeorgie writes – Dungeons and Dragons!!!!!! My favourite! My dad was the dungeon master and boy he was good. The way he introduced it to us was brill. He made all dark and spooky. We came down stairs slowly. He twirled us round and round, sat us down at the table and we played. I like the way you can just ask to do anything you want and see if it happens. I asked if I could play basketball with a skeleton’s head. It smashed on the stone floor!

d&d1

 

40K Combat Patrol – Necrons Vs Black Legion

Being snowed in has some advantages! After the obligatory snowman has been built … time for a 40K Combat Patrol with the boy, with his newly completed Necrons. Black Legion is the only 40K army I own (painted) now, so that was easy. Throwing 4’ of urban landscape together with the Chapel of Sanctuary as the central objective.

The opposing armies are

Necrons

Necron Overlord

Necron Warriors x7

Necron Warriors x7

Necron Immortals x 5

Scarab Swarms x3

 

Black Legion

Chaos Space Marine lord

CSM x5 (+1 plasma upgrade)

CSM x5 (+1 plasma upgrade)

Obliterator Cult x1

The game was simple enough starting as opposite corner. Both side advancing to control the central objective. The Obliterator hanging back as a Lascannon platoon – sniping off a couple of warriors.

The Chaos Space Marine sneaking around the building to try and apply their advantage in H2H.

The central bundle didn’t work so well for Abbadons boys. Bad dice in the assault left very few Necrons needing to roil ‘they’ll be back’ roll.

Once in close combat the necrons attrited the CSM quite nicely.WS4 and T4 with a 4+ Save makes then quite resilient. As the CSM were outnumbered nearly 2 -1 it was only a matter of time. In true Hollywood style the Overlord faced of the Chaos Lord. Despite having the upper hand ( I thought) the Chaos lord went down without even inflicting a single wound on the Overlord. So HQ down, and shortly both CSM squads succumbing to fighting Scarabs and Necrons (after losing their armour save from that Scarab special ability – I forget its name)…  The sole survivor was the Obiliterator.

Makes the Necrons quiet tough!

New Kid on the Blog

For my inaugural post I thought I’d showcase some new talent. Logan for the first time has expressed an interest in painting figures on his own. He is only 6, and we rummaged around the spares box found 5 goblins for him to paint.

Using his Daddies ‘tried and trusted’ cheating painting techniques Logan soon completed all 5 within the hour.

Logan already likes visiting the local GW stores, and got a few Necrons from Santa, so there will be no stopping him soon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

And the finished results