Lurkio.ware t-shirts for the connoisseur

For  bit of amusement I’ve set up a webstore with some retro wargaming shirts. They are definitely niche geek, so if you don’t know what they mean you probably won’t be interested!  if you do then at this point you might be dewey eyed :-)

So if you have always wanted a Crimson Bat t-shirt

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or WRG 6th

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or even ‘exorcists with magic daggers’

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then now is your chance


The Great War – WW1

By way of a change we played ‘The Great War’, the Battlefront WW1 FOW version of the rules. Cousin Mark came over and brought his toys to give them a run out. The Great War (GW) is just a simple derivative of FOW. The scenario we played was 1918 trench battle – The Big Push. The two armies were Germans consisting of 2 rifle platoons of infantry with attached MG and anti tank rifles, an HMG platoon and finally 2 A7Vs (5 platoons strength). They were all classed as confident trained. The British consisted of 2 rifle platoon, with MGs attached, and 3 Male tanks. All of whom were rated veteran. The Germans obviously have picked the wrong bit of the trench to attack!


The scenario dictated that the attackers (Germans) had overwhelming force meaning that any lost platoon (either by losses or voluntary removal) would return as fresh reinforcements. Losses accrued in this manner would count towards the company morale. The effect being that losing 3 platoons would mean that company checks would be required.

The battlefield used the Battlefront trench system, which fits exactly the 4’ required for the game. The rest of the battlefield was defined as hard (bulletproof) cover for non-moving infantry.


The game was pretty straight forward. Each Brits platoon occupied its half of the table (it was looking pretty stretched out). The tanks in reserve. The Germans lined up in their half of the table. The deployment rules meaning that the Germans would be 2 moves away (with or without Stormtroooper moves – Vorwärts) . The A7V were limited to a 4” move and would get left behind unless they were ‘pushed’ to get an extra 2” movement (that would require a skill test, with a risk of a roll of 1 being breakdown). They would be useful in support though each toting 4 MGs and a 5.7cm gun.

The game didn’t really have any tactical finesse. There were 2 turns of advancing, firing , pinning and unpinning. The Germans losses were lite because the British couldn’t really muster a massive amount of firepower – having no HMGs in this section. But with a dozen firing dice per platoon hitting on 3s with a 3+ infantry save the Germans were only losing 2 stands per turn. On the right flank the Germans would always pin due to hits , but failed to unpin. ON the left flank again the platoon would always pin but with the 1IC in tow the 4+ with a re-roll meant they would keep going.

2 of the allied tanks arrived very early and there was a tit-for-tat exchange of gunfire between the Landships with little effect.


The main action was on the left flank where the 1st German platoon had reached the trenches having only taken limited damage. Their flamethrower eliminated 1 British stand, all others making it into assault range (the Brits failed to stop the assault with their defence fire being pinned and a poor show on the dice). The close combat in FOW is always bloody , but the British did have quite an edge being classified as ‘trench’ fighters (meaning they needed 2+ pt hit and eliminate a German stand). The Germans needed 4+ for the same result. The Germans going first did have an edge in that respect and killed 3 stands in the first phase. The allied veterans passed their motivation and charged back in, inflicting about the same in return. Both sides kept passing motivation and the number of combatants fell until finally the British were wiped out. The Germans at that point failed their motivation too and also fled the field, leaving the section vacant. However, with the other British platoon engaging the German on the right flank then there was little to stop the ‘overwhelming’ forces reserve platoon from occupying the position and winning the game. The lead to a British tank to heading over that way to camp next to the objective (supply line junction in the trench). At this point an A7V was knocked out and rightmost platoon was 1 stand from needing a platoon check. That would be 3 required for a company check (which would have a 50/50 chance of failure) . This resulted in the right platoon hiding in the shell holes (gaining a bulletproof cover), allowing the brits in the trenches to file across without risk to try to cover both objective (a tall order)


The fresh Germans advanced and clambered in the trenched unopposed, this was short lived as they were driven into by the newly arrived British tank. This resulted in a real stalemate. The Landship rule meant that even if losing an assault the tank does not have to retreat and is not captured. The tanks also has defensive MGs so you have to re-confirmed each hit. So, with only an ATR and half a dozen stands of infantry the Germans had to throw a lot of dice with even a change of damaging the tank. Typically each stand had only a 25% chance of a hit, followed by 18% change of damage.. slim.

We played out a couple of turns of the assault neither side getting an advantage. On the other flank the Germans were held back, they could try to get refresh reinforcements, but that would require a company level morale check. As we had played for a longer time than we had anticipated we called it there with an allied victory (if the Attacker doesn’t capture and objective the Defender wins)


As a review of the game it was OK. It passed the time without any incident. I like games with lots of dice, but this had LOTs of dice to get any sort of result from shooting. Hit on a 4+, Save on a 3+ , destroy on a 6+ typically. 3 dice with small chance of getting an effect. In contrast the assault if very bloody with a single roll with at worst a 50% chance of destroying a stand. For me it was OK enough, but didn’t really much flavour of the period, and you end up working out the odds of success for each attack on an individual basis rather than executing a plan as such. Very much an exercise in micro management. That said lots of people like FOW – and its mechanisms – and I played it fervently for 5-6 years a few years ago, so I can’t complain. Battlefront GW release is great from a pickup point of view. I believe that this game was just the 2 army boxes and the boxed trench system. So with the rules being free? – still .. and easy introduction to this period. Good pick up for the casual WW1 player.

Squarebashing, canal crossing

For our next game of Squarebashing we thought we’d try a canal crossing, this would allow Ray to use his newly acquired BEF. The canal game differs from the normal game in a couple of keys features. There is no countdown to battle, so that speeded things up a little. The table setup differs only that you put a canal traversing the tables (in-between rows 3 & 4) , it doesn’t occupy a square but acts as a barriers between the 2 rows. The defender gets to place the terrain as normal. The game type is always attack in force but with an extra depletion dice. The objective are different in that they are 3 crossing point on the canal. 1 is where the road crosses, and the other 2 are placed by the defender (each being at least 1 column apart) … AFTER the depletions are made. So the attacker gets to see where the weak point is and then placed the crossings there.


You can just see the BEF deployed above the canal here.Only 4 square of the 8 in the line have any occupancy

The plucky BEF only had 10 units of infantry , and after depletions only 5 were left on table, so the line was looking very thin. The defender also only gets to deploy in row 2 (so needs to move to occupy and defence of the canal crossing). So as always the defending position looked decidedly weak.

The Germans have raced forward to cross the canal quickly


With the attacker getting the 1st turn the Germans called for – and received – a suppression barrage. In a game of completely ineffectual artillery , which is very unusual, all but one of the suppression squares deviated. The only one that didn’t deviate didn’t have any enemy troops in. However, thinks weren’t so bad. The barrage fell largely short and into the squares adjacent to the canal. This has the benefit of preventing the British from moving into those squares in the British first turn.

The Germans lurked forward and occupied the canal bank, ready to cross in 2 out of 3 crossing point in the next turn. As the British were pinned and unable to move into the defending bank, things were looking rosy.

The British 1st turn was quite catastrophic. The higher command has been hit (during the prior suppression barrage) and an luck would have it failed to save (1 on a d6) and had retired off table to the reinforcement pool. Ray has picked ‘assets’ as his higher command type (which allows re-rolls on the asset attempts so means you can spend less dice to try to get assets). Being off table in the first turn meant that he didn’t get it. SO , to try and stop the Germans crossing the canal the BEF had to use nearly all of the dice pool to try and get their own suppression barrage. 10 dice were rolled needing a 6 ….. the result was no 6’s Suddenly with the BEF pinned back, and no artillery, there wasn’t anything that could prevent the crossing. Perhaps it would all be over for Christmas and there was talk of an early drink in the pub.

This was taken after all the bonus assaulting tokens were taken off. It looked so good to start!


The Germans second turn started well. They called and received a shock assault asset and rolled for a ‘fighting dice’ higher command. A large assault was massed on the leftmost crossing. This would be decided ‘a la bayonet’. Being that the assault took place one square back from the crossing the BEF didn’t benefit from any of the defended crossing rules. It wasn’t a completely perfect assault as the crossing was a pinch point and stopped other units supporting from the adjacent squares , rear support was also denied as it was on the far side of the canal. However I thought that the assault had a good chance . 3 full units (9 dice), +3 for shock assault , + 2 for fighting dice (-2 for attacking into hasty defences). The defenders had 1 unit (2 dice), 2 artillery (4 dice) and +1 for British firing. For a total of 7 dice. No –one had any supports . 12dice vs 7 dice … With odds like this there could only be 1 outcome. Yes, 2 hits each(after saves) and the British win (defender wins on a draw) .. the attack stalled. Further hits were applied and the BEF awarded the ‘winning the fight’ bonus for subsequent rounds. All of a sudden it would a lot harder to get past here

This was taken in the later turns where the Germans had spread out. However we do have some reservists having to fill in the line here.


On the central crossing as the Germans has less of an advantage they did not assault and crossed the canal and tried to fan out to establish a ‘beachhead’

At this point luck swung violently against the Kaisers boys. Ray rolled 4 6s for this reinforcements, so the majority of the infantry arrived. It should be said that prior to this Ray had rolled 22 successive d6s in various phases and not getting a single 6 (it was one of those were you count up it was so bad) . He chanced his arm on the central crossing and launched 2 assaults where the odds were even. He won both. The fact that the Germans has their backs to the canal was catastrophic . Being unable retired meant to take another 6 hits. So where we’d lost by 1 in the assault (1 casualty) , then there would be another 3 hits followed by another 6 hits (unable to retire). I’ve never seen so many casualties mount up so quickly. There were squares with 6 or 7 casualties in. Then the subsequent morale check was almost a guaranteed failure , which again because they couldn’t retire generated another 6 hits. In Squarebashing a unit can normally take a lot of punishment. Get caught in a position where you a unable to retreat … Well .. there is a lesson to be learnt!


Don’t get caught with your back to a canal

The rightmost crossing had now been reinforced. With a MG and riflemen in a defended position on the crossing that was shut tight.

The Germans on the left flank failed their single dice morale test – so got a no advance. This halted any further crossing their as the square was full occupancy. Things were looking grim now for the Germans and we could have called it there and gone for that early drink. However we played on.

In subsequent turns the Germans were given some slight chances. On the left they did rally and began to spread out on the far side of the canal and reinforce the crossing. However, were they needed a bit of luck none was forthcoming. All point effect barrage failed and therefore as best all further assaults were even , and nothing really happened.

So we timed out before the countdown clock reached the end. However the result was never in doubt. Not quite a massive victory, but a solid one for the BEF – well done Ray and his Brits (for their first outing)

Ray provided all of the terrain, and it all looks rather splendid I’m sure you agree. The carpet tiles from the 70s suddenly have come back in vogue!

The canal crossing game was good and provided some different challenges. The strange dice results we had were probably not indicative of a normal game would be like. After reading the rules I thought it would be tough as the attacker. But at the beginning I would see a route to victory. Squarebashing has this strange sensation where you think you can do a lot , and then when you make contact with the enemy everything bogs down quite quickly. Which is probably about right.

Batman Miniatures game

Batman is a new game to me. It follows the current zeitgeist of low model skirmish type games. The setting is in the DC universe (as you might expect), but tends to follow TVs Gotham and the Arkham video game series than the comic series, certainly in style. It was brought to my attention as its popular at my FLGS, and as that is a 5 minute walk from where I live, it made sense to put a toe in the water. There was a tournament coming up and I thought I’d enter that – as that is usually a good way to get bloodied in the rule mechanics. So I committed to enter and picked a crew to paint up. I painted up Joker, just for no other reason that he took my fancy and the models were in store. The models are 32mm , and fine in detail. As they have a ‘realistic’ proportional style the details are delicate. The castings are ‘average’ with a bit of work required, and they do require a bit of efforgothamt to paint to make them look good.


The game itself it pretty simple, but has solid mechanics with some depth. Its alternate model activation rather than IGOUGO, with a mechanism for first player each round that it not novel but has a reasonable twist. Each turn has a planning phase (make the plan), where each model has action point to plan in to movement , attack , defence or special actions . As each character gets damages their action points go down. So all sensible so far. After the plans have been made then its time to execute them. Each character then spends these points until their activation is complete. Nothing earth shattering here… things like base movement (MC) 10cm, but if you spend a special (SC) then you can sprint double – in a straight line. Combat has either 2 or 3 dice phases to complete. Roll to hit (on opponents defence) , the opponent then can defend (if they have defence counters to spend) , then any hits roll to wound. Damage ie either ‘stun’or ‘lethal’ (blood). A model can take up to their endurance in damage with the sum total of both markers. If they hit their endurance with blood, they are dead. If in stun (or stun /blood combined) then they are KO’d. KO can be recovered from, as can stun damage in a recovery phase.


Each character has a set on individual traits and equipment that gives them flavour. It starts to look a bit like Warmachine as this point where its rules by caveat and exception. But as the model count if just lower its not quite so bad. Each crew is only about 4-12 models. You have a fighting chance of remembering!


The meat of the game, however, is the scenarios. They are objective based, with a few different types, which has some in-game effect and a VP score. So ammo for instance allows you reload your firearms and score you points. The objectives are largely placed on the board where have to plan to move. They are either in or close to your opponents deployment – or in no man’s land. You score objectives each turn (and they score 1-3 each), a KO or Kill scores you 1- 4 points. Given the game is 5-6 turns long there is a possibility of ~12-20 points available to score. To Kill a crew is probably going to net you 12~. You probably need to play for both but you certainly don’t have to concentrate of killing the opposition as the only root to victory.


My brief games at the Titan games event

My Crew was –

  • Joker
  • Deathstroke
  • Master of Ceremonies
  • August
  • Sniggering
  • Triston

So 2 firearm armed clowns , 2 axe armed clowns and Joker to control them. My beatstick being Deathstroke (who is nearly ½ of my army in cost)

Game 1 , Steve with League of Shadows

  • Ra’s al Ghul
  • Deadshot
  • some ninjas.


Only my second game ever (the first being a demo in store). We both were cautious as neither of us were greatly familiar with the rules. We both had a similar plan – grab the closest objective and drag it back closer to the baseline. I had rushed Deathstroke up to try to eliminate 2 ninjas. This had a neat effect in game of concentrating the activation in this section of the board. As I had fewer models I could then spend activations elsewhere to some effect. What it meant is that I always got the drop on Deadshot who was lurking at the back. From his rooftop position sniggering with his AK, peppered Deadshot over 2 turns. Luckily I managed 2 hits (Deadshot get several ‘pings’ and dodges) but 2 solid hits (3 blood each) neutralised him. I was later to realise that this was a vital event as Deadshot being the go to guy. All my opponents taking him


On the other flank Deathstroke was having trouble taking down these Ninjas and had attracted the attention of Ra’s (who is another power piece). So I was ended up being outnumbered. Deathstroke being a martial artist doesn’t count the outnumbering rule (which is pretty catastrophic) BUT I fell into the trap of rather than concentrating on 1 opponent ended up attacking on then the other. Deathstoke has put blood on all of opponent (including Ra’s) but now he was taking blood too. He used his soul armour special to remove blood – but his time was up. Rather than go down fighting he used his acrobat ability to escape the combat, and dash toward the rest of the crew (as he was somewhat isolated) . However, Ra’s caught up with him and delivered the coup de grace. However, in my favourite cinematic moment of the day. Joker you had been camping loot in a building near the back stepped around the corner and pulled his one shot gun. The fact that the combat had moved back 24cm meant that Ra’s was now in range – BOOM> the one shot gun did the trick and Ra’s was done for too. However, being immortal he can’t die so I only gained the KO points. But that wrapped up that game. You totted up the points, and it was an exact draw with 28 points each. I was happy with this start a good game


Game 2 , Leon with Black Mask

Leon’s crew was a hodgepotch of free agents rather than a glut of gangsters. He has

  • Black Mask
  • Deadshot,
  • Catwoman
  • some Blackmask goons (one with a automatic rifle with night sights)

I enjoyed this game and Leon did a great job of explaining the rules and mechanics (thanks Leon). With 2 powerful shooters both with good vantage points I was a loss on what to go. I send Deathstroke round the long way (as he is fast with advance deployment). Leon was worried about this and moved away from that area. Catwoman grabbed a loot counter and batarang’d to a high rooftop and camped there (its great vignettes of action like this make this game special IMHO) Her special ability allows her to get an extra VP each time she score loot. So on the roof he was going to easily get 10 points just from this action (over 5 turns). I had nothing that could easily climb (not thinking about this). So it was unlikely that I would much from this game.



I somewhat sacrificed some clowns running down the road. Deadshot an Mesh(?) with his nightscope has some full tapping those goons. But that did allow Deathstroke to turn the corner , leap a fence (acrobat) and sprint and catch Deadshot in the street. With a snik-swish of katana action Deadshot was somewhat diminished. He staggered back to get away but was low on action (bleeding heavily). 2 Blackmask goons joined the fray. Deadshot was KO’d by Joker (with is remote control teeth?!). But the game timed out. Leon has a solid victory . I did have few points on the board with the Deadshot KO


Game 3 , Martin with Suicide squad

  • Harley
  • Deadshot (seeing a pattern?)
  • Mr Hammer
  • some Harley and joker goons.

Martin was practicing for a big comp next week so was testing out his tournament build. This was game was painful and I should forget. I was a masterclass on not what to do. My ambush ability meant my opponent had to deploy first and he duly split his force into 2 halves. I thought I’d try a rush with Deathstroke into 1 half. Given his advance deploy , acrobat and going first I reckoned I could make it into combat on the first turn. With a sprint and 2 MS (2d6 extra cm) I needed a 9 , scoring a 5 … so ended up short , right under a lamppost ( light! All of the game are in dark Gotham, the only light sources being lampposts ) . Deadshot from his rooftop advantage stepped up and fired. Harley pulled her semi auto and let fly , after taking a lot of blood she stepped up and battered Deathstoke. He was KO’d… However, he did pace his endurance roll to wake from the KO and when into defence mode. So he tried to use his soul armoured to heal 2 blood. But with the loss of action counters it was never going to be enough. Harleys goods with the chainsaw stepped up and finished him in no uncertain manner. Deadshot shot Sniggering (my AK clown) who had climbed to the rooftop to try gain a good vantage. So in 2 turns my crew had been gutted. The rest of the boys ran up but in a hail of automatic fire followed up with brutal close combat it wasn’t even funny. A violating experience, giving me food for thought!


So in conclusion, was it any good? Well I think it was. The game itself has great flavour and character and that goes a long way. The rules seem solid and have multiple options for victory. I would be little wary of the night scope assassin type. Most people seemed to have something like this in their crew. Given a good vantage point they seemed to be able to assassinate a model each turn. Given they have 3-4 shots (ammo) per game you just can’t walk down the street ! So I’ll have to think about that … Its probably not a deal breaker and if you can feed them goons at least they will be occupied while you win elsewhere. I suspect you want quite a high model count to just do a lot in the game (objective wise). So thumbs up from me. If you are a fan of the DC universe and the recent TV spin offs then I’ve say this is worth a go.

I won the best painted crew prize too so, all good for me!



harley deathstroke clowns3 clowns2

Age of Sigmar at Warhammer world

Being at the release party of Age of Sigmar at Warhammer World was too good an opportunity to miss. So booking an ealry table for a bit of 40K action in the morning we headed off to Lenton.

First thing , the rumours were true and the Space Marine and Aquila has been usurped by a ’Sigmarine’.


We saw the new Forgeworld shop. Sadly, this is as close as we’ll come to owning one of these bad boys – £900 to you sir!aos2

A quick précis of our 40K game. We had just painted up the tomb blades as that Logan could field a Reclamation legion. However, as we were only playing 650 (to get a 120 min game in ) he didn’t want to use the immortals and opted to use lychguard.

aos5That drop in reanimation protocols tipped the balance. I’d knocked up Ultramarines with Tigurius and devastator Centurions and 2 tactical units with Grav guns too. The Ultramarines normally had a torrid time against the Necrons so I beefed them up a bit. But perhaps a bit to much. So with Tigurius getting Invisibility (not hard) then invisible Centurions pounded out the fire.
Pretty much a whitewash …. So just goes to show that even with points you have to consider what level to aim the game at! (more on this later)




So after the obligatory lunch at Bugman we pressed on to the Age of Sigmar demos.


“For you Lurz ze war is over.. relegated to scaring small children exiting the washroom”

Unless you have been living in a hole then you know what the Age of Sigmar is, and the nerd rage that this has generated.  I tried to take an objective view of the whole situation. I’ve being playing Warhammer Fantasy battle since 1983, and every edition (to a greater or lesser extent). I admit it has come as rather a shock to see the old world ended. Its heritage in engrained in my psyche after 30 years.




“The games being played of AoS (non GW demo), looked neither skirmish or ‘just a mash up’. Also the standard or presentation looked markedly higher, with all the big kits out on display”

However the demos flowed pretty well. I thought it was going to be a hard sell, but after 10 minutes I picked it up. It not hard … it very lite. aos7But do you know what ? it was actually quite fun!  Lets put aside balance and all that sort of stuff , the games there were the starter boxes and are probably balanced. But there was a situational tactical element to it. The sequence of activation and pile in choices meant something. aos8The magic is toned down and the monsters are toned down .. I cab see how big units are not going to be effective  with the bravery test (which can double up your casualties).


So there you have it, I enjoyed it!  Not enough to buy the box (and it they can’t sell it to me – then they might be in trouble! ). The aesthetic might not suit me , or the fluff might be nonsense. But the game seems to work in a beer and pretzels sense. Not the convoluted WFB charge baiting or hero hammer (guff) … and I can see it not suiting all, but I can see it really making a difference to their entry level target market.  So I can see it being successful. Maybe not with ubergamers, but kids and old (wise) gamers for sure.

We played 2 starter box games , in about 2 hours. Fun has had by all, and our opponents shook our hand at the end !


I did speak to various folk – it seemed staffers were touting for opinion – and as a wargaming face who am I to remain silent 😉  The whole balance thing did come up (no points – all that stuff) … and I think we need to wait for the next – big – book just out on pre release now, as that has all the ‘battle plans’.. as I understand it a cross between a dataslate and scenario generator. They expect maturity in the gaming fraternity to be able to deal with the games that they want to play. The framework is very loose, and thy want to give as many options for people to play as possible. Have they read Black Powder  I wonder :-)


“Logan with his new Space Wolf T-shirt”

While we were there the new exhibition centre was open. So we checked it out. I was looking forward to seeing all the old models , but when I saw them I was a bit disappointed as I’ve got them all! However the new exhibits were stunning .. So here are some selected photos.

aos26 aos24 aos22 aos21 aos20 aos19 aos18 aos17 aos16 aos15 aos14 aos13 aos12

The day just raced by and it was soon 6pm and time to leave – great day :-)

FoG:R at Stoke Challenge

Stoke Challenge is a small competition only event, with FoG:R, DBMM and Saga. Being local, my arm was twisted to participate , despite trying to cut back on FoG:R this year. I picked Japanese for no other reason than an army had made its way into my possession.

The army was (650pt)



The Runners and riders

So actually a good set for the Japanese with a lot of bow based armies.

Game 1 Ray with Qing Chinese.
Not a good matchup for the Chinese. These dastardly fellows are designed and drive away nomadic horsemen (and rather anachronistically, in a quirk of the rules European pike and shot!). Though of armoured warrior swordsmen would not appeal. The game was straight up Ray has ½ a dozen big bow blocks with regimental guns, and a couple of old school armoured bow cavalry. The Japanese just matched the bow frontage. I had had offered up a couple of end units up as bait to allow the warriors to arrive en-masse.stoke_quing3

Everything went reasonable well. The shooting had little effect , as expected, and there was about 2’of troops in melee in about turn 4. The impact had swung in favour of the Chinese. Having a regimental gun and light spear , meant that the spearmen were slightly trumped, and a few units did disrupt. However in the ensuing melee being armoured with a sword against unarmoured with no sword meant that the butchery work could being (rolling 3+s , re-rolling 1s vs rolling 5+ not re-rolling – that is how we like it)

Rays army caved in. But the detail had meant that he did nibble off a too many end units , so the Japanese didn’t escape unscathed.stoke_quing1
The Hatamoto offered up to protect the flank. they died in all three games

Score was 16-9 to the Japanese

Game 2 Keith with Western Sudanese
It was looking like this was going to be a day for the glory of the Shogun. More unarmoured warriors to deal with. These big bow armies can catch the ‘typical’ western Pike and Shot armies out because they are voluminous and can win an attrition war. However, this is trumped by another ‘behind the time’ genre where they haven’t realised that gun powder isn’t the way forward. Keith was actually worse off that Ray , as his troops didn’t have the regimental guns or the light spear. I thought I’d follow the same plan as before offering up a couple of sacrificial units on the ends to delay while the main event sorted itself out.

stoke_sudanese2This worked out pretty much as planned. Even Keith’s mounted wing of Tuareg camels didn’t face charging armoured spear frontally. So they tried to sneak their way around. There was one section where his guard bow and armoured spear (but average) tried to make a stand. But even where we were on par, the Japanese had more luck, and prevailed quickly. When the main body of samurai contacted the Sudanese archers it was quick work.


Score was 21-4 to the Japanese

Game 3 Steve with Later Swede.
So sitting on top with 40 point , the next closest was Steve with 35. It was a good lead , but I would need a win to guarantee the competition. A less favourable matchup for me. Salvo foot with regimental guns, with impact cavalry. My only hope was to swamp them with numbers. Steve had obviously had this in his plan , so rather than picking all the usual superior units has selected an army of entirely average troops (not often seen in the modern game). Consequently his army was bigger than mine, so I’d have to hope that my superiors would be able to grind it out. This is not unreasonable as the average pike and shot BGs are brittle. If I could hold on and try to get a protracted melee then it might pan out ok. It wasn’t going to plan though. Our centres closed and the salvo with regimental guns soon started to pay. The impact was brutal. Being at a — POA meant that the warrior had some painful tests to make, and many disrupted and lost bases (some even losing 2 bases on first contact).


After that it was rather unfavourable. The fight settled down to who could throw the most 4’s. But losing a 3rd of bases for being disrupted, and having lost bases, meant that my opponent would be throwing twice as many dice. Even re-rolling 1’s & 2s, after committing the generals to the front rank to try and fight my way out of the situation, meant that it was unlikely that I would win. However, average troops being just that I did start having a bit of luck. One BG of samurai had rallied and defeated their opponents and then crashed into the supporting cavalry behind. After surviving another horrible impact the spears actually put the average cavalry to flight . One the other flanks some Japanese archers had put some dragoons to flight and then lucked out against a pike and shot unit next to them. So both sides were haemorrhaging units. The Swede would win just by sticking to the plan, there were plenty more units that were lined up. The Samurai could win but finding those points would be more tricky as the favourable match ups we few and far between.

The battle group score teetered perilously for both sides with a point to spare. The Japanese has lost 9 out of 10 , and the Swedes 10 out of 11.

The deciding factor came down to a fight where samurai had broken a units of pike and shot who were routing, behind which lay the Swedish guns. Capturing those would secure the game (and the competition). However, being warrior meant that I would either have to break contact with the routers and then make a rallying test out that the swedes would pass through and I could capture them that way. This was not to be. The swedes had obviously had lead lined boots. They rolls three 1s for the route moves moving only a grand total of 3” out of an average of 9”. The warriors being more speedy could then never lose contact. So even a cheeky shot with 2 archers who were about 1” away from the guns (who were disrupted) could fragment (and win that way). But it was not to be. The swedes hovered up the 2nd line Ashigaru and won the day.

The score was 9-16 to the Swedes.

This left me on 49. Steve scored a total of 51 to secure 2nd. But Dene leap frogged us all to 52 after a masterclass of cohesion tests against Bob.


Not a good day at the office for Bob’s Quing against Dene’s dice










Great games. I like the Japanese , simple and effective – great fun to play with.

Final standings


Short Salute 2015 photo journal

I have to admit I was a bit overwhelmed by Salute this year and as such my photo snapping was short and random, there seemed to be hundreds of folks with camera phones so I;m sure there will be more comprehensive pictures.

Some views –

  • There seemed to be large (and I mean large) expenditure. If this is a barometer of recession then surely it must be over.
  • Very young crowd. A lot of young folks
  • Very diverse ethnicity of attendants
  • 50M queue for Forgeworld within the show!!
  • Historical games probably a minority now. Fantasy skirmish being de jour.

I thought it was a very healthy show. But a bit much for me




The crowd was absolutely massive this year. The highlight being a bit of mob rule where it seems that everyone in the snaking entry queue just seemed to make a mad surgery towards the entrance



Some Warlord game previews


Terminator preview





Spartan games





Hawk wargame flagship




Battlestar galatica

Warhammer World trip

We took a trip up the road to Lenton to Warhammer world, this was Logan’s first visit, and it was my birthday too.  We booked a table to play a game in advance, so we had anticipated to stay the whole day. We’d booked into the Premier Inn just along the canal at Nottingham Marina (which is actually recommended, as you couldn’t get any closer and avoids all the unpleasant road works around Lenton. They are putting new tram lines in and actually when they are finished getting to WW will be a breeze as the tram goes right outside to the railway station.

Warhammer world is going through renovations right now, with a grand re-opening in May. It was a little disappointing the museum/exhibition centre was closed, the shop seemed reduced in range, and the number of gaming table looked lessened and more cramped. However, there is still Bugmans bar.I could just spend the weekend there!


We played our game in the morning, and a luck would have it it was the last day for submission to army of the month. So, the staff there were keen for us to submit our armies – which we did. That meant hanging around for a few more hours after lunch.


Which was fine, we have cake and coffee and a leisurely wander around the other games and store. I was genuinely surprised about the amount of unpainted figures that were in use. For the flagship store you’d think they would have some sort of minimum requirement. These weren’t young kids that were doing this!ww4

Anyway come 4 o’clock the announcement was made and Logan had won the army of the month – which as you can imagine he was pleased as punch. His army is now on display there for the next month in the winners cabinet if you have chance to swing by.


Nice day out.

I’ll let Logan tell his story!

On Friday 27th 2015 we went to Nottingham and stayed at a hotel overnight. The next day me and dad went to Warhammer world while mum and Georgie went shopping, as we walked up the gravely road the first thing I saw was a giant statue of a space marine looming ahead. Behind it was a life sized model of a rhino parked in the middle of the huge car park.

ww1We walked through the entrance of the building into a dwarf restaurant called Bugman’s which had an excellent menu full of delicious meals. Then we went into the gigantic gaming room full of quality tables, I got a little bit of a shock when I turned round and saw Lurtz glaring down at me from up a stand next to the door! Next me and dad went down to our reserved table in the middle of the big room and set up our game, with me playing necrons and dad playing grey knights (oh no!). On turn one I rolled a six (oh boy! I needed a lot of those!) ww3So I went first. Since no grey knights were on the table yet (they all teleport in :-( ) I had to move so I shuffled my warriors a bit and moved some of my tanks forward and that was really all I could do. Next dad deep striked all over the table with his big titan-y robots right in the middle of my base, capturing all the objectives and ruining my plan. Then he had the nerve to challenge my warlord, foolishly, I accepted and guess what? My lord got killed outright, before I could even attack! I was furious and pushed forward with all my might but it was no use the grey knights are too good. Halfway through, a man came up to us and asked us if we were entering the “army of the month” competition and we said no (we weren’t) so he asked us if we’d like to and we said yes and he told us to put our army’s in the glass cabinet at one o’clock and. So we carried on playing until one, and packed up our stuff to display in the cabinet. Then we had 2 hours to kill so we went back to Bugman’s and I had cockatrice pieces (chicken nuggets) ww7and some juice. Next we went to the shop/stall and had a look round then I took out my wallet and brought a rhino for my space wolf army.

ww6It was three o’clock now and we were waiting for the votes to come in when they finally did I was extremely nervous. The winner for the staff’s choice was another necron army then they said the ultimate winner was another necron army, I knew there was only two other necron army’s left mine and someone else’s. They said the winner was…



Me! Me! I was the winner! After I’d had my pictures taken and got a certificate we went to Bugman’s to have coffee and cake and the next day we went home.

More Christmas gaming – Squarebashing

We’ve been playing Squarebashing for about a year now, so its time I wrote up a review. For the centennial of WW1, we’ve just concentrated on 1914 armies, and in this game we see the plucky BEF face of the Germans.

The Armies.
The classifications are pretty simplistic. Infantry and cavalry are broken down into reserves, regulars and professional. Each battalion is 4 bases in strength. MGs and artillery are single bases. Tanks and A/Cs are all single models.
The BEF are predominately professional, and therefore are small. The ‘standard’ game we played was something like 7 professional battalions, 2 regulars, 4 MGs and 4 artillery.
The German army of this period is based around a regular force. So we had 10 regulars, 2 reservist, 2 professional and 3 regular cavalry. In addition there were 4 artillery and 3 MGs.
With each army comes a set of assets (artillery barrages) and also ‘events’ (these being randomly determined effects that effect the game in some way)… more of these later.
This all comes round to a overall army status rating. This will determine the overall quality of the army (and ultimately and delta adjustment that is applied to the final victory point tally)

Countdown to War.
Peter Pigs rules often have a pre battle phase, Squarebashing is no exception. This consists of a 3 week period where events make have an effect on the game. This takes the form of a calendar in which you allocate values, which become numbers of dice. You and your opponent then do and opposed dice off (5&6s being successes) . The player with the higher number of successes then has the access to their armies ‘events’. This is a 2 dice roll. Values of 2-5 having a negative effect , and 5+ being positive (generally the higher the better). You can roll –over success to the next day, then gives you increased dice to throw and should you win and modifier to you event roll (+6) ,so you cannot get a bad result. With each event comes an attacking value. These are accumulated, and will determine who the attacker in the game is – and the level of attack
There are strategies to this. If you have a defensively minded army then you can stack alternate days to try and neutralise your opponent’s throws. However, I never seem to get this to work as I expect – or certainly not in a way that feels ‘favourable’
In the game we played here, we kept the values as ‘default’. The BEF doesn’t like to attack in my experience, but neither does it like to suffer ‘the big push’ …
The narrative that was rolled in the game was,
The BEF had initial good news (lucky dice), and Kitchener gave his ‘Khartoum speech’. This meant that the BEF could choose to reroll two sets of assault dice (both players)
Then the Germans just took over. The weather was good, and high command had issued aggressive orders. In game terms this meant that the Germans could ignore any terrain penalties for moving in turns 1 & 2 (so they would be moving swiftly). It also netted a good chunk of attack points. They also exploited gaps in the BEF line (this meant that 2 BEF battalions would be sent into reserve). This meant that the Germans were most likely to attack
Combined with the fact that the Germans had some cavalry (boosting the likelihood of attacking). It wasn’t quite ‘the big push’, but it was ‘attack all along the line’.

Objectives, Terrain and deployment.
The table is 4’x3’, broken down into 6” squares. The defender sits at row 1 (the attacker row 6). Two roads are played (one by each player). The resulting crossroads is 1 objective. The defender then places another 3 objectives. There are restrictions. They cannot be placed in adjacent column, and the total of all the objects rows must be 13 or more. So what that means is that the objective are space across the table, and in games we tend to give one object to the attacker (row 5 or 6) to allow the other objective to be places in lower value rows. In the game objective further across the table will gain you larger victory points.
After the objective the defender places 8 pieces of terrain. Each terrain piece is 12”x6” (2 squares) , whereas an objective is 6”x6”. This makes it really easy to spot these things in the game.
The most notable effect of terrain is that troops have to dice to leave a terrain square. Once your Austrian conscripts have gone into that wood they really don’t like to come out! Other effects are that some terrain provides cover and some block LOS (although that is not so relevant)
In the game here with the Germans having unrestricted movement in turns 1 & 2 then they wasn’t much point in jamming up the top of the table to hinder their approach. So the BEF tried to construct a strong defensive line across the middle of the table.
The attacker does get some say. They get to allocate d6 dice to terrain and on a roll of 4+ they get to move them. In the game here that meant that the Germans could open up a corridor of open space to the left of the battlefield. To attempt to split the BEF, give a space for their cavalry to operate, and achieve a breakthrough.
The attacker then deploys the whole force in row 6, the defender then deploys in rows 1&2. Each square has a max occupancy of 3 units. If the attacker has more than 18 units then they have some that are forced into reserve.


Everyone’s favourite part of the game! Before the game begins the attacker gets to deplete the defenders army. You can think of this in terms of preliminary barrage, or units losing their way of reassigned to a different section. What it means is that depending on the level of attack, a number of dice are thrown between 5-9~. For each 6 thrown one base of removed from the defenders battalion. This is done for each battalion (from R-L). Rather than taking the casualties the defender can put the troops into reserve. The throw can be modified by troop quality, placement and type. The defender must also have at least 1/3 (rounded down) of their infantry and cavalry off table).
This phase can be rather tense. If the attacker throws well then you can lose a lot of troops and you have a tricky decision to make whether to suffer the casualties of bring the troops on during the game. This is not a quick and reliable process.
In the game here we have 9 BEF battalions. 2 already have to be placed in reserve as a result of countdown to war events. So, only 1 more needed to go to reserve. The Germans scored well and the central objective had one of its professionals reduced to half strength. Placing then in reserve wasn’t really an option as the movement bonuses the Germans had would allow them to capture it quickly.
The BEF would be up against it. Their army was split. The left flank was isolated (although in good order), defending the crossroads in the town. The centre had been denuded significantly. The right flank was in good order, but strategically had little to do.
The defender then gets to place 2 sections of barricades.
Finally before the game begins each sides gets to pick a higher command strategy. There are 4 types available. Fighting, Morale, Assets and Movement – each with an associated bonus in that area.
The Germans picked Fighting. The BEF picked Morale.
The Game Turn.
There are quite a lot of phase in each game turn, and this can be quite daunting at first. Its definitely worth keeping the QRS to hand, as its listed there. Really it a good plan to stick to it rigidly to start as there are some nuances on the order of things. I won’t go in to explicit details on the order, but will try to give a flavour.
At the start of the game each army has a unique asset pool. This is a pool of dice in which to request that asset. Once the dice is used then that’s it. To successfully request and asset a single 6 is required. So for instance if you had 10 point effect barrage you could roll 1 dice for 10 turns hoping for a 6. More likely you would have 2 attempts with 5 dice. There are about a dozen or so assets and you can only pick 1 per turn. The game is about typically 6-8 turns long (could be as low as 4, or as high as 20 though!)
The trigger for a morale check is having a casualty figure in a square. A number of dice are accrued, 1 each of casualties , barrage, surrounded by opponents etc. These can be reduced by quality and ‘markers’. For each 4+ thrown this is 1 morale failure. 1 means no advance up to 3+ which is ‘quit the field’. Which sounds worse that it is. It means that if you have taken a couple of casualties (2 dice) from fire and under point effect barrage (3 dice) things aren’t going to go too well.
Infantry move 2 squares, cavalry 3, MG and Guns 1. No diagonals, quite easy. You can get a bonus move square if you don’t end up in a square adjacent to the enemy. The main issue for movement is leaving any terrain square to another. Each battalion dices to try and exit a terrain square. Professionals needing 2+, Conscripts 4+ . This can put a scupper on well laid plans!
This is the main way of destroying the enemy and capturing a square. If a unit has movement points left it may assault a square occupied by the enemy. Each units in the assaulting square typically generates 3 dice (remembering a square occupancy limit of 3). Assaults need to be supported. Adjacent square add 2 dice to assaulters ‘dice pot’. Markers , flanks and lots of other little bonuses can add to that, defences etc can reduce it.
The defender normally gets 2 dice (5 dice for MGs!!) per unit & 1 dice per support square. Again a set of modifiers with add and subtract from that dice pool.
Both sides roll the dice, 5&6s are hits. Saves are then made. So infantry get a 50/50 save, again better and worse quality factors apply. If the attacker inflicts more hits then they win, and force the defenders to retreat a square and they move to occupy it. Casualty markers accrue and morale checks will be needed in the subsequent phase. Once you retreat you also take additional hits, it’s a slippery slope.
You shoot in your opponent turn. Any square that has not been assaulted can fire. The range is only adjacent, except for artillery and mortars, so there is little need for LOS. Each battalion fires 1 dice and needs a 6 to hits (which can then be saved). It’s unlikely that you will drive your opponent off with shooting.
If a side has reserves it can dice for arrival now. There are 3 options
1. Each units dices. A 6 and it can arrive
2. 1 unit comes on automatically
3. 1 unit comes on automatically on the road entrance square. 2 more dice rolls (needing 6) are also done.
Number 3 is most popular, and its not unusually for a defensive strategy to revolve around where the road is, as that is easier to defend.
Countdown clock.
The defender rolls 1 die. This is then knocked of the countdown clock (starting at 21). When it gets to 0 then the game ends.
Victory calculation.
When the game ends the victory points are calculated. Each KPI is either a value or a dice. The dice are thrown for a resulting victory points. So it can be a bit random. But in my experience it never makes a lot of difference in an ‘obvious’ victory, but can swing games that are closer. Each side’s values are compared and the resultant delta it referenced on a chart to get the final result. The key objectives are –
Defenders bonus. The defender gets bonus points for the level of attack they have to face.

  •  Destroying enemy bases.
  • Destroying enemy units
  • Capturing objectives. These are skewed in value by their relative position. So for
  • example the attacker gets 4d6-row for an objective, so this could be as little as
  • 4d6-6 (as little as 0 but typically ~8), or as high as 23 (typically 13~)
  • Capturing squares in either row 2 or 3 (ie a high defence, or aggressive attack)

Our game.
The game we played was pretty straightforward. The Germans has gained an advantage in the pre game phases. Their events had synergies, and the BEF had been depleted in the centre. The attacking Germans first turn called in a point effect barrage on the BEF centre. When a point effect barrage is rolled you place 9 barrage marked on an L shape of 3 squares. The square also takes hits. So if you take a casualties (d6 hits) , you are looking at a severe morale check in the next turn (a minimum of 4 dice), this can be reduced by a higher command order. The BEF had picked morale has their higher command. However, the first base to be lost (although only put in reserve) was the higher command team itself. So it moved off table and then the next turn couldn’t try to save its soldiers.


The resulting morale check was grim. One object was completely evacuated, and the other was down to a damaged MG and 2 bases of infantry.

The BEF had to shuffle to the right to try and fill the gaps that were opened in the centre. But that meant the right flank was becoming thin. They successfully received a suppression barrage (a 5 square long line of barrage markers), this did halt the Germans advance for 1 turn, but the BEF were just too thin on the ground.

The left flank had 2 battalions of professional and a MG in a barricaded square (pretty tough). But it was isolated. It was surrounded and assaulted. The killer being that the gap that was opened up by the Germans allowed the cavalry to get behind the isolated Brits. This means that if you lose the assault then you cannot retreat and take additional hits. The BEF saves were good, but it was only a matter of time before they were whittled down. The German has captured two of the closer objectives at the start of the game, and were soon captured the left flack crossroads. They also got their cavalry to the BEF baseline to get a breakthrough bonus! The cavalry who are normally gunned down in games were definitely the stars with the swift advance, and stopped the BEF from retiring.

The BEF were reduced to bring on a drib drab of reserves who were close the enemy and rushing to defend the last central objective. Which held on to, but it wasn’t enough. The Germans has achieved a solid victory.

I like Squarebashing. I love the fact that it has a lot of chrome for the period. It does allow for forging a strong narrative in a game. Each stage of the game is documented and complete. I like the pre battle phase and terrain placement. I’m not a fan of ‘terrain placed by mutual agreement’ type rules.

Being a grid game it is anachronistic, and probably won’t be to everyone’s tastes. But I would recommend that anyone who has an interest in this period take a look


georgie Georgies view –
I have to say I liked the game myself! The fate of the game was pretty much decided: Germans! The Britain’s were more Quality than Quantity and in this sort of game you need Quantity! In only the first few goes, the Germans had put most of the English men into reserve! The next couple of goes was total disaster, the Germans planted a destroying barrage on the mainly important (and the minimal amount of) soldiers, killing quite a few soldiers! Since you don’t have to measure the route, they could reach you in an amount of seconds! Near the end of the game (which was very long) I felt myself drifting away from the game. I would highly recommend this game to people who have a very wide attention span so that you can remain focused on the game! There is plenty to worry about because lots is always going on! I think it is a quite clever game!

Christmas Gaming

Quiet often reviving old games from years gone by can be a mistake. The rose tinted spectacles that accompany such exercises can prove disappointing. However, I am always attracted to games of my youth, Dungeonquest being no exception. The FF revised edition is what we played today. Easier as don’t have too many memories of the original, but with the kids outgrowing the old TSR/Wizkidz Dungeon – having played it many times! I thought it would be a step up to a more mature game (queue references to D&D akin to double entry bookkeeping)


The game flows much better than I remember. There is defined period of play (the suntrack), players have activities outside of their turn. Each turn is speedy, so the game moves along at a fair old pace. When I looked at the box it estimated 1hr. I can vouch for that as we played 2 games in 2 hours, both with a conclusion.

What I like about it the most is that there is a real challenge to escape the dungeon. With 15-20 turns in total your really have consider your exit strategy from the start. For instance 6 turns in going into the catacombs can be a real mistake considering you have to pull a card to get out and then you end up in a random spot that can be impossible to get out from. Greedy players intent on getting to the Dragon room in the centre have their work cut out to get in and out in time.dq3

I also like the fatal nature of the game. Not often a good thing when you draw a card where the negative outcome is ‘character death’. But with the quick turnaround of the game itself then it’s actually OK. Quite often you can ‘secret door’ into a empty room with no exits, and with no way out (ie in your action turn you cannot move or search, then you die) … it adds to the sense of adventure (after all you cannot have adventure without risk)

We played 2 games. In the first all members died. Georgie and I went into the catacombs too late. Georgie succumbing to a blade trap and my character being eroded away by Razorwings then getting finishes off by a ‘Greedy Deep Elf’ whom I couldn’t afford to bribe to get me out of the Catacombs. That left the way clear for Logan to just escape to win. At that point he was in the Dragon chamber, with a treasure. He got all the way to the penultimate space to exit. This was a trap space. Its result was ceiling fall and the room rotates forcing him into a pit from which he couldn’t escape. It was exciting and had the children demanding more.

The second game was similar. I had a swift exist. Single room with a secret door leaving to a empty room … trapped !

Georgie entered the catacombs again. Dew 2 spiders and was gradually being bitten to death. She spent about 8 turns in there before succumbing to monsters with no exit in sight.

Logan had been stalled at the beginning being stuck in a spider web and then caught with rockfalls with a lowly agile character. However, with both other players gone his lowly 40 GP was enough to escape and win with 2 turns to spare before night started to fall. An inauspicious victory – but aren’t they the sweetest?

dq4Great Christmas game with the Kids – recommended.

 Georgie review





Personally I thought it was an amazing game because imagination sprouted in every nook and cranny there was! It was extremely tense, scary and exciting. It was exciting because there were multiple ways you died; you could die by the sun timer and you would get trapped if you didn’t get out in time, there is a massive possibility to get killed by a monster, you draw an unlucky room tile and get you trapped in an area with no doors only walls or you could be a victim to lethal weapons! My brother Logan has won every time so far (2) and I’ve died every time so far! It’s almost comical about how dangerous it is!

 Zulus on the ramparts was the 2nd game we played. In this it’s a solo/co-op where the gameplay is keeping the 4 lines (each representing the horns, chest & loins) of the Zulu threat out of Rorkes drift. This wasn’t such a hit. It took a long time to punch out the chits. There was only 1 sheet, and it was laser cut , but the slots were very tight and there was substantial sooting from the laser cuts (small niggles I know)


The game is strong on narrative with all the character represented. But it made for very disrupted game. There was a repeated reference to the rule book. There was a lot (to my mind) of ambiguity in the rules and lack of clarity. This despite each rules section being broken up with a specific point references. Duplication of the same action in the same game turn (bringing heroes to the fore) was clunky. I could feel the kids drifting away. I thought I would like it more. I had Schiess on the north wall, Hook in the hospital. Even the ‘Pot that man’ volley card couldn’t save me from being disappointed. I’ll give it another go, but one first reflection there are better resource management exercises out there.

georgieGeorgie review

Truthfully I found the game dull and a bit tedious since, let’s just say, it took longer to set the game up than to actually play! I didn’t really understand it! The good thing is that we won on our first go! It didn’t really have enough going on and wasn’t really exciting because we mostly just pushed the Zulus away from the camp, they came back and we shot at them again. The turns were too quick for me to get an idea of what was going on and when I did get an idea, it was too slow for me to pay attention.

Preferably I’d choose Dungeon Quest over Zulus because I’m more of the imaginative type and like to make decisions and I liked to have my own character!


Lurkio DBA v3 Armies added to the website

I’ve added the following DBA v3 packs to the website

CHA03- DBA v3 Chimu Imperial Army 1350-1480AD
CHA04- DBA v3 Coastal Peruvian Army 1350-1490AD
EBA03 – DBA v3 Early Byzantine Army 493-544AD
EBA04 – DBA v3 Early Byzantine Army 545-578AD
HUA03 – DBA v3 Attila’s army 433-453AD
HUA04 – DBA v3 Other Hunnic Armies 374-558AD
INA03 – DBA v3 Inca Imperial Army 1438-1534AD
LMA01 – DBA v3 Later Moorish 25-696AD
MPA02- DBA v3 Other Mapuche 1461-1552AD
MPA03- DBA v3 Araucanians 1461-1552AD
SPA03 – DBA v3 Sassanid Persian 220-224AD
SPA04 – DBA v3 Sassanid Persian 225-493AD
SPA05 – DBA v3 Sassanid Persian 494-651AD
SRA02 – DBA v3 II/81a Sub Roman British
SRA03 – DBA v3 II/81b Sub Roman British
SRA04 – DBA v3 II/81c Sub Roman British
VGA05 – DBA v3 Italian Ostrogothic 493-561AD

please take a look if you interested

DBA v3 Armies link

DBA v3

Today my copy of DBA v3 arrived, in the continuing struggle to find rules that accommodate by collection of ancients that seem to be gathering dust. So here is a quick review based in a 10 minute flick through.image

First thing to note is the format. A4 and hardback. Definitely a move up from the A5 paper bound 2.2 rules. There are also 142 pages. So what do we get for our £20?

The rules themselves still come in 14 pages and have added what looks to be a lot of chrome. The mechanics are the same with a few more troop types with more interaction. Gladly not the brain straining my bound your bound of DBMM. There looks to be a lot of expansion in the terrain section too.FINALLY moving to an all metric measuring system – hurrah! Welcome to the 20th century!

The next section are 15 pages of diagrams. The fact that you need 15 pages of diagrams illustrates the legendary prose Mr Barker is capable of.


I notice the comment about being understood by a dull 9 year old is now removed. Useful though to avoid argument

The last and most weighty section is the army lists. There are now nearly 300 lists. Expanding form the 3 or 4 line from the old rules, each list now has a DBM style paragraph with background and notes on the army. Most worthy as I like reading these! Especially the pithy comments … “fit only to kill chickens…”


As I understand it great attention has been paid to the clarification and simplification of the writing style. Only time will tell on that front. Overall a nice product , looking to be worthy of the title of magnum opus, as folk are already saying